Now available: Additional images from the George Eastman House

November 10, 2010

Gertrude Kasebier; Lolipops; 1910; image provided by George Eastman HouseARTstor has collaborated with the George Eastman House to add more than 14,000 images to the Digital Library. The world's oldest museum of photography is now represented in ARTstor approximately 19,000 examples of photographs, from early daguerreotypes to contemporary prints. The additional images significantly increase the number of photographs available to ARTstor users for teaching and scholarship.

The collection represents photographs ranging from early to contemporary photography. Of particular note is an important collection of daguerreotypes produced by the Boston photographic firm of Albert Sands Southworth and Josiah Johnson Hawes, whose artistic portraiture established them as the first masters of photography in the United States. Other notable portraits include those taken by Julia Margaret Cameron, the 19th century British photographer known for her portrait studies of Victorian luminaries. Beyond portraiture, there are fine examples of 19th century travel and landscape photography, whether focused on the Middle East (Abdullah Frères, Félix Bonfils), or the American West (William Henry Jackson, Carleton Watkins). Also well-represented is the 19th century French photographer, Eugène Atget, whose images of Parisian street scenes and architecture would influence later Modernist photographers. Figures from the Modernist Photo-Secession movement are featured with works by Edward Steichen, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Gertrude Kasebier, and Francis Bruguière. Other 20th century photographers will also be included, such as Margaret Bourke-White, Brassaï, Walker Evans, Andreas Feininger, Victor Keppler, Nickolas Muray, Arnold Newman, Arthur Rothstein, Aaron Siskind, Paul Strand, and Minor White.


For more detailed information about this collection, visit the George Eastman House collection page.


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Image credits

Gertrude Kasebier; Lolipops; 1910; image provided by George Eastman House