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December 7, 2006

New Addition to the ARTstor Digital Library! Islamic Art and Architecture

In February of this year, we announced the first fruits of our collaboration with Sheila Blair, Jonathan Bloom and Walter Denny, through which we will make available up to 25,000 images from the personal image archives of these three distinguished Islamicists. We are now pleased to announce that an additional 3,600 images have recently been released into the ARTstor Digital Library, bringing the total number of images from this collection now available to ARTstor users to more than 9,000. This latest release includes images of the Islamic architecture and decoration of Turkey, Morocco, Spain, Iran and other regions of the Islamic world.

To browse these new images, please click on “Image Gallery” on the ARTstor “welcome page” and then select “Islamic Art and Architecture Collection (Sheila Blair, Jonathan Bloom, Walter Denny).” Or search for images from these scholars’ archives by subject or by using their names as keywords (e.g. “Walter Denny”).

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December 7, 2006

ARTstor to Collaborate with Esto: the Wayne Andrews Archive

ARTstor is pleased to announce an important collaboration with Esto and the estate of renowned architectural historian and photographer, Wayne Andrews. Through this partnership, the entire Wayne Andrews Archive of approximately 4,000 black- and-white architectural photographs – preserved as large format, black-and-white negatives in Esto’s archives – will be digitized and distributed by ARTstor for non-commercial, educational and scholarly use.

The architectural photography of Wayne Andrews (1913-1987) is familiar to educators and scholars alike, both through Andrews’ own seminal publications on American architectural history and by virtue of the fact that for the better part of 35 years (1952-1986) Andrews generously made his photographs available through his catalogues in a way that significantly advanced classroom instruction as well as scholarship in the history of American architecture. In the present collaboration, ARTstor and Esto seek to build upon Andrews’ own commitment to the educational use of his photographs.

Lisa Andrews, Wayne Andrews’ daughter, expresses her enthusiasm for this collaboration when she says: “I am grateful for the collaboration between ARTstor and Esto that will not only allow greater scholarly access but will preserve these images for future generations. I am thrilled that this record of the architectural past will survive, keeping alive my father’s legacy along with many of the great buildings he loved.” Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, adds that “The inclusion of the unique Wayne Andrews Archive in ARTstor will enrich ARTstor’s ability to support the teaching and study of architectural history. We are delighted to be working with Lisa Andrews and our friends at Esto to make this important archive more broadly available for educational and scholarly use.”

Wayne Andrews was born in Kenilworth, Illinois, September 5, 1913. Educated in the Winnetka Public Schools and at the Lawrenceville School, he graduated from Harvard College in 1936. Curator of Manuscripts at the New York Historical Society, and an editor at Charles Scribner’s Sons, Andrews studied with Henry Steele Commager and received his doctorate in American history at Columbia University under Allan Nevins (1956). His PhD dissertation was published as Architecture, Ambition, and Americans (Harper’s, 1955; revised edition, Macmillan, 1978). Archives of American Art Professor at Wayne State University, Detroit from 1964 to 1983 – a position created for him – Wayne Andrews emerged as an important architectural historian and photographer who wrote extensively on architecture. In such publications as Architecture in America, Architecture in Michigan, Architecture in Chicago and Mid-America, Architecture in New York, Architecture in New England, American Gothic, and Pride of the South: A Social History of Southern Architecture – all illustrated with his own photographs – Andrews continued to explore architectural and social history in pioneering ways. His other scholarly works include social histories, such as Battle for Chicago and The Vanderbilt Legend; Germaine: A Portrait of Madame de Stael and Voltaire; Siegfried’s Curse, a history of Germany focusing on artists and writers from Nietzsche to Hesse; and the posthumously published The Surrealist Parade.

As the final title suggests, Wayne Andrews was also a life-long Francophile and lover of Surrealism. As a young man, he corresponded with several of the French Surrealists, as well as with Salvador Dali. Andrews’ own Pianos of Sympathy, written under the pseudonym of Montagu O’Reilly, was the very first book published by New Directions (1936). Who Has Been Tampering with These Pianos? followed (New Directions, 1948); it was reprinted by Atlas Press (London, 1988) with an introductory essay – “Montagu O’Reilly and Wayne Andrews” – by James Laughlin that would also serve as the afterword to The Surrealist Parade (New Directions, 1990).

Wayne Andrews died August 17, 1987, in Paris. He and his wife Elizabeth had flown to Europe that summer in order to take the remaining photographs for a book on 18th-century architectural follies, never published though the photographs have been preserved.

Wayne Andrews’ collection of black-and-white architectural photographs and negatives are in the stewardship of Esto Photographics, Mamaroneck, NY. Esto also manages the archive of Ezra Stoller (1915-2004), the premier photographer of modernist architecture, and many other important architectural photographic archives. Erica Stoller, the director of Esto, works with a small, well-trained staff to manage the archive, handle research requests and arrange photography assignments for the collaborating architectural photographers: Peter Aaron, Jeff Goldberg, Anton Grassl, Peter Mauss, David Sundberg, Jeffrey Totaro and Albert Vecerka. Through the present collaboration with Esto, the entire Andrews archive of some 4,000 black-and-white negatives is now being scanned and will be available, through ARTstor, for non-commercial scholarly and educational use in the course of 2007. The archive embraces not only the architecture of the United States, where Andrews photographed extensively, but also much of Europe – including Russia and Scandinavia – as well as Canada, Mexico and Brazil. Esto continues to support the editorial and commercial use of images from the Wayne Andrews Archive, and ARTstor’s presentation of the Andrews Archive will direct ARTstor users to Esto for such uses.

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December 7, 2006

ARTstor Collaboration with the Visual Media Center, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University: QTVRs of World Architecture

ARTstor and Columbia University are pleased to announce a collaboration intended to encourage the use of Quick Time Virtual Reality (QTVR) panoramas of world architecture in teaching, learning and scholarship.

The Visual Media Center at Columbia University’s Department of Art History and Archaeology has taken a lead role in developing QTVR documents of world architecture. Through a recent agreement, Columbia will work with ARTstor to distribute several hundred of these documents for educational and scholarly use as part of the ARTstor Digital Library. QTVR enables faculty and students to complement traditional side-by-side image comparisons with a mode of representation based on space and context. The VMC has documented monuments and sites including such antique sites as the Pantheon and Domus Aurea in Rome (Nero’s “Golden House”), Early Christian and Byzantine sites such as Galla Placidia, the Orthodox Baptistry, Sant’Apollinare in Classe, San Vitale in Ravenna and Hosios Lukas in Greece; Islamic sites including the Hagia Sophia; Medieval cathedrals from Amiens to York; numerous Renaissance and Baroque architectural monuments; and important 19th and 20th century sites including the Paris Opera, Le Corbusier’s Church of Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp, Rem Koolhaas’ Seattle Public Library, and many others. At the same time, ARTstor is pleased to be sponsoring an upcoming Columbia QTVR campaign in Venice, Italy, which will produce panoramas of a range of historically significant sites from various eras in the city’s storied history. This project will be conducted under the aegis of the Columbia University Center for Study in Venice at Casa Muraro.

Acting as Field Director for the Columbia QTVR campaigns, medieval art historian Andrew Tallon has, over the past six years, photographed more than two thousand 360° spherical QTVR nodes of some of the greatest monuments of European architecture – at present the largest such collection in existence – which he and his colleagues use for both teaching and research. Speaking as both an informed practitioner and a scholar and teacher, Tallon observes that “QTVR represents a huge advance over the traditional slide. It allows both teacher and student to experience architectural space in ways that were not possible before. Le Corbusier’s chapel at Ronchamp, for example, is both difficult to access and defies two-dimensional representation; but with QTVR it can be brought directly into the classroom. Similarly, the entire sculptural program of the central portal of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris can be explored from a single interface, with the user zooming in to see details as desired.” Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, expresses ARTstor’s enthusiasm for this partnership. “We are delighted to be working with our friends at Columbia both to extend the reach of their pioneering work with QTVR and to help ensure that this work can continue. We are convinced that QTVR and related technologies have the potential to transform the study and teaching of architectural history and other related subjects, and believe there is an important role for ARTstor in advancing this effort.”

The Visual Media Center at Columbia University explores material culture, vision, media, and pedagogy in the broadest sense to connect faculty research and student learning through the creative application of technology.

The first fruits of this collaboration should be available to ARTstor users early in 2007

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December 7, 2006

ARTstor to Collaborate in Documenting the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain Rock-Cut Cave Temples at Ellora, India

ARTstor is pleased to announce that it has reached an agreement with Dr. Deepanjana Danda Klein, through which ARTstor will digitize her unique archive of photographic documentation of the more than 30 rock-cut cave temples at Ellora, India. The approximately 2,500 black-and-white and approximately 4,500 color photographs of the Buddhist, Hindu and Jain cave shrines at Ellora – produced in connection with a collaboration with Professor Walter Spink from University of Michigan and Deepanjana’s dissertation devoted to the site, now being published as an exhaustive scholarly study – will significantly strengthen and deepen ARTstor’s already strong collections in Asian Art.

Ellora has been described as a “site of outstanding cave temples, datable between c. AD 575 and the end of the 9th century, 20 km north of Aurangabad in the Sahyadri Hills, Maharashtra, India. The caves were excavated into volcanic rock along a 2-km stretch of west-facing embankment; there are 34 major caves, numbered consecutively rather than chronologically, starting with the Buddhist group (Caves 1–12) in the south. Other groups are dedicated to the Brahmanical pantheon (Caves 14–29) and to Jainism (Caves 30–34). The most notable monument is Cave 16, the Kailasa Temple” which “represents the culmination of rock-cut architecture, with huge sculptural reliefs heightening the overall symbolism of the temple as cosmic mountain and as the home of Shiva” (Grove Art Online).

The present photographic campaign at Ellora represents the first systematic documentation of the entire site, including the first photographs of previously undocumented caves. Dr. Walter Spink, Professor Emeritus of the University of Michigan, speaks to the significance of the current project when he says “Due to the knowledge, energy, and technical expertise of Dr. Deepanjana Danda Klein and the enthusiastic cooperation of her husband, Dr. Arno Klein, scholars now finally have a truly comprehensive photographic coverage of this great site’s varied Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain material.” And Max Marmor, ARTstor Director of Collection Development, expressed ARTstor’s enthusiasm for this collaboration. “We have long admired the South Asian documentary efforts that have emerged from the University of Michigan over many years. The inclusion within ARTstor of Deepanjana Danda Klein’s documentation of the immensely important shrines at Ellora will significantly enrich ARTstor’s already strong offerings in the art of India, anchored by the Huntington Archive of Asian Art and the ACSAA Color Slide Project materials just now being added to ARTstor.” The first fruits of this project should be available to ARTstor users early in 2007.

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December 7, 2006

Collaborative Agreement Reached Between the School of Architecture, University of Texas at Austin, and ARTstor

ARTstor and the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin are pleased to announce that they will collaborate to digitize and distribute approximately 9,000 images from the Hal Box and Logan Wagner Collection of Mexican Architecture and Urban Design Images. These images richly document outdoor communal spaces in Mexico, focusing on both Pre-Columbian sites and 16th-17th century Colonial sites.

Hal Box, a practicing architect, was Dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin from 1976 to 1992. In 1988, Box began to study and document the 16th-17th century open air churches of Mexico under the auspices of Earthwatch with additional funding from the Graham Foundation, the University Research Institute and the University of Texas Institute for Latin American Studies. Logan Wagner, a native of Mexico and an architect-builder with degrees in anthropology, architecture, and a Ph.D. in Latin American Studies, led the field work for the next twelve summers. Box, Wagner, and volunteer groups carried out photographic documentation and preparation of measured drawings of open air churches and other civic spaces in the states of Morelos, Mexico, Michoacán, Yucatan, Quinatna Roo, and Hidalgo. Wagner extended the study with archival research.

In reaching this agreement, Elizabeth Schaub, Director of the Visual Resources Collection at the School of Architecture, University of Texas at Austin, and Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating to preserve this unique archive and to make its contents available for educational and scholarly use through ARTstor. “I’m very excited that the School of Architecture has an opportunity to collaborate with ARTstor. Our joint venture will result in a broader audience gaining access to unique content that finds a new life in digital form,” comments Elizabeth Schaub. “Our partnership with the School of Architecture at UT Austin will significantly advance ARTstor’s effort to provide a rich body of images of Latin American architecture and art, from Pre-Columbian to contemporary, for use by teachers, students and scholars,” affirms Marmor. “We hope this will be the first of several important ARTstor projects involving the rich collections of the University of Texas at Austin.”

The Visual Resources Collection of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin is comprised of more than 235,000 slides and approximately 50,000 digital images. The main purpose of the collection is to support the teaching needs of the School of Architecture’s faculty members and students

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November 20, 2006

Larger Downloads

We are pleased to announce the release of larger downloads for approximately 100,000 images in the ARTstor digital library. This new download capacity is part of ARTstor’s ongoing effort to facilitate broad access to digital images for teaching and scholarship. Users will be permitted to download large images (many at 1024 pixels on the long side) for use in classroom presentations and for other noncommercial, educational uses in a variety of software environments. Users can download ARTstor and local images up to 3200 pixels for offline classroom presentations by using the ARTstor Offline Image Viewer (OIV). Users wishing to download ARTstor images outside of the OIV software — for use in PowerPoint for example — are now able to download some images up to 1024 pixels on the long side.

To date, ARTstor has limited the size of all images that can be downloaded outside of the ARTstor software environment to 400 pixels on the long side. This restriction has been in place as part of our ongoing effort to balance the interests of content owners — who often expressed concerns about downloading — with the needs of ARTstor users in accessing these images for pedagogy and research. Ongoing conversations with many of our content providers have confirmed their sense of ARTstor as a trusted, shared space for the study and use of digital images and this allows us to provide greater access to larger downloads. This means that some images will be available for larger downloads while other images will continue to have the current downloading restrictions.

The availability of large downloads has unavoidably been determined on an image-by-image basis, not a collection-by-collection basis. Images that were originally made available in reliance on fair use or other educational exceptions will continue to be restricted. We will continue to have discussions with our existing and future content partners to encourage them to permit greater access to larger downloadable images for your use in teaching, research and presentation.

While we believe this development will prove helpful to those users who have expressed interest in downloading images outside of the Offline Image Viewer, we continue to recommend the use of the OIV, both because of the uniformly large downloads it permits and because of its features which allow users to easily mix local content with ARTstor images, zoom in on details and other functions that are expressly designed to support the needs of teachers and students working with digital images.

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November 20, 2006

New: Three digital collections from the Cornell University Library

We are pleased to announce that the Artstor Digital Library has just been enriched by three important digital collections from the Cornell University Library. The collections are:

Andrew Dickson White Architectural Photographs
The Andrew Dickson White Architectural Photographs Collection is a collection of nearly 1,400 19th- and early 20th-century photographs of architecture, decorative arts and sculpture in Europe and the U.S. These materials will complement both Artstor’s already strong holdings in the history of architecture and its expanding holdings in the history of photography.

Southeast Asia Visions
“Southeast Asia Visions” is a digital collection of European travel accounts of Southeast Asia dating between 1630 and 1930, from Cornell University Library’s John M. Echols Collection and Rare and Manuscript Collections. This collection provides online access to the visual content of more than 350 books and journal articles written in English and French. The images now included in Artstor from the Southeast Asia Visions collection were selected for the quality of their first-hand documentation and visual beauty, providing a comprehensive visual representation of Southeast Asia as recorded by Europeans. The accounts in the collection include some 10,000 images, drawings, photographs, prints and maps, many of them in color. This collection will powerfully complement Artstor’s already rich holdings in the art, architecture and culture of Asia (as reflected in the Huntington Archive of Asian Art, the Mellon International Dunhuang Archive, and the ACSAA Collection from the University of Michigan, the first fruits of which have recently been released into the ARTstor Digital Library).

Masterpieces from the Hill Ornithological Collection, Cornell University Library
This selection from the Hill Ornithological Collection at Cornell offers a collection of more than 200 images that traces the development of ornithological illustration in the 18th and 19th centuries. In its focus upon the 18th and 19th centuries, the collection complements Artstor’s already strong holdings in the history of prints (anchored by Artstor’s digital version of The Illustrated Bartsch) as well as Artstor’s growing collection of natural history illustration (especially the “First Fleet” collection from the Natural History, London).

We are grateful to the Cornell University Library for wishing to share these outstanding digital collections through the Artstor Digital Library.

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November 20, 2006

New Addition to the ARTstor Digital Library: Native American ledger drawings

ARTstor’s “Native American Art and Culture” collection has two components. The first, made available to ARTstor users some months ago, consists of more than 10,000 high resolution images made from historic photographs richly documenting Native American subjects (portraits, scenes, etc.). These digital images have been made from glass plate negatives collected by or produced under the auspices of the Smithsonian’s Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) beginning in the late 19th century.

The second component of this collection, just now made available to ARTstor users, consists of high resolution images of ca. 2,000 Plains Indian ledger drawings. Plains Indian ledger drawings, mostly produced in the middle to late decades of the 19th century, represent an important indigenous artistic tradition of great and increasing interest to art historians and other scholars. These drawings on paper, often done on the pages of ruled ledger books acquired through trade, continue a long tradition of painting on buffalo hides and other available media.

These two archives are among the most heavily used resources in the Smithsonian’s National Anthropological Archives. This digital version should be invaluable to art historians, anthropologists, cultural historians, and indeed to all scholars, curators, teachers and students who deal with American and Native American art, history and culture, as well as to scholars engaged with the study of cross-cultural encounters.

To locate these images, on the ARTstor “welcome page” just select the Native American Art and Culture from the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution collection; then either use the browsing structure (arranged by tribal group) or simply search the keyword phrase ledger drawing. Or search the latter phrase from any search screen in ARTstor to find these and related images.

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November 20, 2006

ARTstor to Collaborate in Documenting the Art and Architecture of Korea

ARTstor is pleased to announce that it has reached an agreement with Carl and Jennifer Strom of Topanga, California, through which ARTstor will digitize and distribute the unique Strom Archive of the art and architecture of Korean Buddhist monasteries. The Strom Archive will significantly strengthen and deepen ARTstor’s already strong collections of Asian Art.

The Strom Archive consists primarily of photographs of South Korean Buddhist temple and monastery painting from the Choson Period (1392–1910). Carl Strom began photographing Korean temple art in the early 1970s with the goal of preserving a visual record of an important, vanishing art form. In the course of his travels, Carl Strom visited and evaluated approximately 500 small and large temples and monasteries, documenting approximately 120 locations. These include not only Buddhist temples but also Confucian, shaman, private ancestor and roadside shrines. Among the art objects photographed were rare altar paintings, as well as sculptures and mural decoration. Many of these art works have subsequently been lost or destroyed. The Strom Archive’s historical timeframe ranges from the 13th to the 20th centuries, with the highest concentration of paintings dating from ca1600–1800. The temple sites, building names, and inscriptions identifying artists, occasions, dates, donors, and monks were all recorded along with the measurements of the paintings. In addition to the temple and monastery painting, approximately 20% of the photographs document the Emillle Collection of non-academic, indigenous Korean folk painting. Carl Strom photographed the Emillle Collection before its eventual dispersal.

Burglind Jungmann, professor of Korean art history at the University of California Los Angeles, is generously collaborating with ARTstor and the Stroms on this important effort to digitize the Strom archive and to make it more widely accessible for educational and scholarly use. As Professor Jungmann notes, “Since Korea and the Korean Buddhist church have become quite wealthy over the last decades, temples have been renovated and temple walls re-painted. In most cases the new colors are much brighter than those used before. It is also quite possible that some art works have been lost in the process. Moreover, in the 1970s there was hardly any tourism in Korea but, of course, nowadays temples have also become tourist sites. Research on Korean Buddhist art of the early modern period (Choson period, 1392–1910) only started in earnest in the 1990s. Before then it wasn’t really considered of any particular value compared to the great periods of Korean Buddhist art of the 8th to 14th centuries. And even now, there are very few publications about monasteries and their decoration …. As for Buddhist architecture itself, there are only a few, very selective publications.” Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, adds that “The inclusion of the unique Strom Archive in ARTstor will enrich ARTstor’s ability to advance the work of students, teachers and scholars throughout Asian Studies very significantly. We are delighted to be working with the Stroms and UCLA to make this important archive more broadly available for educational and scholarly use.”

The first fruits of this project should be available to ARTstor users in the course of 2007.

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November 20, 2006

ARTstor Collaboration with ART on FILE

ARTstor recently sponsored a photographic campaign by Rob Wilkinson and Colleen Chartier of ART on FILE — a primary supplier of images to libraries and visual resources collections supporting teaching programs in contemporary architecture, urban design, landscape architecture and public art. This sponsored campaign was focused on contemporary architecture in the western United States.

As one fruit of this important partnership, ARTstor and ART on FILE have now reached an agreement to digitize afresh, at very high resolution, the entire ART on FILE archive of images which will be made available as part of the ARTstor Digital Library. ARTstor is also pleased to announce that it is sponsoring further photographic campaigns on the part of Rob and Colleen, both here and abroad, beginning with a campaign devoted to the theme of sustainable architecture.

Rob Wilkinson of ART on FILE speaks to the value of this partnership when he says: “This partnership will allow us more time to document projects thoroughly, to broaden the range of projects we photograph and to build more comprehensively our collection with some of the most outstanding new buildings and public spaces in the United States and overseas.” Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, affirms the importance ARTstor’s collaborations with ART on FILE. “ART on FILE is a preeminent source of high quality teaching images of contemporary architecture and public art. Rob Wilkinson and Colleen Chartier know these subjects and they capture these works uniquely well. We at ARTstor are thrilled to have established a multi-faceted partnership with our friends at ART on FILE, through which we will be able both to extend the reach of their existing archive by including it within ARTstor and to support their ongoing work.”

ART on FILE images are produced by photographers Rob Wilkinson and Colleen Chartier. Their images have appeared in most national and international design magazines, text books and newspaper journals throughout the world.

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