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September 27, 2005

Collaborative Agreement Reached Between Art Resource, Scala Archives and ARTstor

Art Resource, Scala Group, and ARTstor announced today that they had reached an agreement to collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of approximately 12,000 high quality digital images of Italian art and architecture. Scala Archives’ photographic holdings uniquely document the artistic heritage of Italy and Europe from antiquity to the 20th Century, with particular strengths in the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance. The scholarly literature on these subjects has long been fundamentally dependent upon the Scala Archives, whose color photographs richly illustrate virtually every important monograph on Italian architects, artists, and monuments, as well as textbooks and historical surveys of the art of Italy. Among the monuments, sites, and museums that are expected to be included in this collaboration are the Uffizi Gallery, the Galleria Borghese, the Vatican Museums, the Roman Forum, the Palazzo Pitti, the Brera Museum, the Churches of Ravenna, the Catacombs, Pompeii and very many others.

In reaching this agreement, Dr. Theodore Feder, President of Art Resource, Alvise Passigli, Vice President and CEO of the Scala Group, and James Shulman, ARTstor’s Executive Director, expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating to use digital technologies to make these high quality images of the art and architecture of Italy more broadly available for noncommercial educational and scholarly purposes. “We are delighted to be able to augment ARTstor’s offerings to its many subscribers in a field so essential to the study of art history and archaeology,” comments Dr. Feder. “Our new partnership with Scala Archives and Art Resource represents an important milestone in ARTstor’s ongoing effort to provide teachers, scholars and students with high-quality digital images of key works and monuments of world art,” affirms Shulman. “We are excited at the prospect of working with Scala in an ongoing way to further develop their extraordinarily rich archives and ARTstor’s library of images.”

Scala Archives was founded in Florence, Italy, in 1953 when color photography was coming to be the medium of preference for recording works of art. The firm soon established working relationships with most of Italy’s museums as well as a number of other institutions outside of Italy. It has at one time or another served as the official archive for many of these collections, including the Vatican Museums. The archive now numbers some 80,000 large format (5 x 7″ and 8 x 10″) transparencies covering all periods of Western art from antiquity to the present. Scala transparencies are offered for use in books, magazines, prints, CD-ROM, television, film, and publicity.

Established in 1968, Art Resource is the principal source of fine art images for commercial and scholarly publications and other contexts in the United States. Art Resource functions as the official rights and permissions representative for a wide range of museums and visual arts archives around the world.

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September 20, 2005

ARTstor Announces Immediate Release of Additional Images from Museums

In July 2005, ARTstor announced the release into the ARTstor Digital Library of more than 25,000 images from the former AMICO Library. Now an additional eight institutions, formerly part of AMICO, have contributed a total of 55,000 images to ARTstor. This brings the number of images in ARTstor from institutions which were formerly AMICO members to approximately 80,000.

The new institutional contributors to ARTstor include:

  • Dallas Museum of Art
  • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
  • Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • Library of Congress
  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute

While most of these works were originally part of the AMICO library, some museums have contributed additional content that was not originally part of AMICO and/or have provided ARTstor with improved images and associated cataloging.

To locate these new images, which have been integrated into the ARTstor Image Gallery and its browsing taxonomy, you may use “AMICO” as keyword when searching. For best results, combine “AMICO” with additional search criteria, such as repository or creator name.

All of the following former AMICO members are now contributing content to ARTstor:

  • Asia Society
  • The Cleveland Museum of Art
  • Dallas Museum of Art
  • Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College
  • Fine Arts Museums of San Franciso
  • The Frick Collection and Art Reference Library
  • George Eastman House
  • Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • Library of Congress
  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • The Minneapolis Institute of Arts
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute
  • Victoria and Albert Museum
  • The Walters Art Museum

Watch for upcoming announcements about the release into the ARTstor Digital Library of images from The Detroit Institute of the Arts, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Terra Foundation for American Art.

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September 12, 2005

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and ARTstor Reach Collaborative Agreement

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and ARTstor are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement whereby the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography (part of Cooper Union’s School of Art) and ARTstor will collaborate on the distribution through ARTstor of several thousand high quality digital images of modern graphic design. This collaboration will focus initially on a digital design archive previously familiar to the graphic design community as the National Graphic Design Image Database.

The focus of the Lubalin Center’s efforts, including the effort represented by the former National Graphic Design Image Database, has been to disseminate material related to the history of visual communication in the twentieth century and to encourage and support interdisciplinary studies of visual history and communication. The present collaboration will make this rich body of visual material and related scholarship available online in ARTstor, where it will complement related graphic design materials from a variety of sources. The audience for these highly valued materials will include teachers, students, designers, and all students of the history of visual communications, who will value having the ability to access, browse, and make rich educational artistic uses of this valued resource.

“The collection created by the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography represents a pioneering effort in the documentation and dissemination of graphic design history,” says Ellen Lupton, Curator of Contemporary Design, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. “The on-line collection is an invaluable and unequaled resource for designers, students, and educators.” Sheila de Bretteville, Professor of Graphic Design, Yale University, adds that “an online resource devoted to the history as well as the most advanced contemporary forms of graphic design is essential to students, faculty and practitioners hungry for this visual stimulation. ARTstor’s effort to resurrect the former National Graphic Design Image Database would be a most needed and desired start!”

In reaching this agreement, Mike Essl, full-time faculty member in graphic design at Cooper Union, expressed his enthusiasm in collaborating with ARTstor to make this important graphic design resource more broadly available for noncommercial artistic, pedagogical and artistic purposes. “The Lubalin Center is very pleased to be working with ARTstor in making our online digital image archives more widely available to students and researchers in the field and excited to participate in its representation of modern design content.” Max Marmor, ARTstor’s Director of Collection Development, expressed ARTstor’s keen interest in this partnership. “The Lubalin Center’s graphic design collections, and its admirable efforts to make them available in digital form, are well-known. We at ARTstor are delighted to help in reviving the pioneering effort embodied in the former National Graphic Design Image Database, and to help make the Lubalin Center’s resources more readily available to artists, teachers and students.”

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, established in 1859, is among the nation’s oldest and most distinguished institutions of higher learning. The college, the legacy of Peter Cooper, occupies a special place in the history of American education. It is the only private, full-scholarship college in the United States dedicated exclusively to preparing students for the professions of art, architecture and engineering. Since opening in 1985, the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography has served as a hands-on research facility for students, faculty, design professionals and the public. The facility has evolved into a multifaceted resource devoted to the documentation and preservation of the history of graphic design.

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August 2, 2005

The Artists Rights Society (ARS) and ARTstor Reach a Collaborative Agreement

The Artists Rights Society (ARS) and ARTstor are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement under which ARTstor will distribute to its participating institutions throughout the United States and Canada a rich body of images of modern and contemporary art for educational and scholarly use. Under this collaborative agreement, ARTstor will include digital images of a significant number of copyrighted works of art by artists and estates represented by ARS.

Theodore Feder, President of the Artists Rights Society, expressed his enthusiasm for this collaboration. “We are very pleased to inaugurate our collaboration and to contribute to the many authorized images offered by ARTstor,” says Feder. James Shulman, Executive Director of ARTstor, similarly expressed his pleasure for the relationship that ARTstor has built with ARS. “We have been developing collections of modern and contemporary art from ARTstor’s inception, and are continuing to build new collections on an ongoing basis,” says Shulman. “But we have all along felt that we need a way for artists and estates to have a voice in the development of ARTstor, and this agreement helps accomplish that.” Samuel Sachs II, President of the Krasner-Pollock Foundation, also voiced his support for this relationship. “From Ancient Chinese cave painting to Pollock and well beyond, ARTstor is demonstrating its enormous potential to transform the way in which art history is taught and learned,” stated Sachs. “The agreement to enable modern and contemporary artists to be included is a major step forward.”

Under this agreement, ARTstor expects to make available soon a significant number of images of modern and contemporary art works by ARS artists. ARS represents numerous artists and estates, including (to name a few): Anni Albers, Milton Avery, Alexander Calder, Sam Francis, Red Grooms, Robert Indiana, Barnett Newman, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Ad Reinhardt, Susan Rothenberg, Mark Rothko, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

US art museums contributing modern and contemporary art to ARTstor – including both former museum members of the Art Museum Image Consortium (AMICO) and other museums sharing content through ARTstor – will also benefit directly from this agreement, which includes a provision authorizing these museums to place images of a number of works by ARS’ American artists on their own websites when they contribute images of those works to ARTstor for educational and scholarly use.

ARS is the preeminent organization for visual artists in the United States. Founded in 1987, ARS represents the intellectual property rights interests of many visual artists and estates of visual artists (such as painters, sculptors, photographers, architects and others).

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July 20, 2005

Collaborative Agreement Reached Between ARTstor and the National Gallery of Art

ARTstor is pleased to announce that it has reached an agreement with the National Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C.) to collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of the Foto Reali Archive, one of the most important photographic archives belonging to the National Gallery of Art Library’s Department of Image Collections.

The National Gallery of Art Library’s Department of Image Collections has unusually rich photographic archives. The Foto Reali Archive is among those most prized by scholars, and as such it is routinely consulted by art historians, art conservators and curators, historians of art collecting, and other scholars. Foto Reali was a Florentine photographic firm that surveyed private art collections as well as dealer inventories in Italy in the early twentieth century, often photographing the paintings in situ. Among the private collections represented in the archive are such key collections as those assembled by Harold Acton, Vittorio Cini, Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Luigi Grassi and Eugenio Ventura.

The contents of this important archive will greatly enrich ARTstor’s value to a wide audience in the history of art and related fields, especially students of Italian Renaissance painting. It closely complements the Sansoni Archive at the Frick Art Reference Library, concurrently being digitized for distribution through ARTstor. Everett Fahy, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman of the Department of European Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has studied the Foto Reali Archive intensively. He stresses the documentary value of these early photographs of Italian paintings. “Many of the early photographs of paintings belonging to dealers show the paintings before they were restored, often in their original frames,” says Fahy. “As many of the works are unknown even to specialists,” adds David Alan Brown, the National Gallery of Art’s Curator of Italian Paintings, “this vast image collection holds out the promise of exciting discoveries.”

In reaching this agreement, Neal Turtell, Executive Librarian, National Gallery of Art, expressed his enthusiasm in collaborating to use digital technologies to make these important scholarly resources more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes. “The National Gallery of Art is excited to make the unique contents of the Foto Reali Archive more accessible to the academic and museum community. Our collaboration with ARTstor is a natural outgrowth of Paul Mellon’s commitment to excellence in art historical research,” commented Turtell. James Shulman, Executive Director of ARTstor, adds, “The Foto Reali archive is a unique source of information on early collections of Italian paintings. ARTstor is delighted to be able to play a part in making it more easily accessible for scholarly and educational purposes.”

The Department of Image Collections of the Library at the National Gallery of Art is a study and research collection of images documenting European and American art and architecture. Established in 1943, the collection now contains almost 10 million black-and-white photographs, negatives, slides, and microform images of all aspects of Western art.

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July 12, 2005

ARTstor Announces Release of New Images, Formerly in the AMICO Library

ARTstor is pleased to announce the release into the ARTstor Digital Library of over 25,000 images, most of which were formerly a part of the AMICO collection. As of today, users of ARTstor will be able to view images provided by the following museums:

  • Asia Society
  • The Cleveland Museum of Art
  • Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College
  • The Frick Collection and Art Reference Library
  • George Eastman House
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • The Minneapolis Institute of Arts
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • Victoria and Albert Museum
  • The Walters Art Museum

To locate these images, which have been integrated into the Image Gallery and its browsing taxonomy, you can use “AMICO” as a keyword when searching. For best results, combine “AMICO” with additional search criteria, such as repository or creator name.
In early August, we anticipate releasing approximately 85,000 additional images from:

  • Dallas Museum of Art
  • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
  • Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • Library of Congress
  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art

We will make additional announcements when those images are available in the Library and will continue to keep you updated of additional releases of images and of new museum agreements as they are reached. For more information about our work on the AMICO project, please see our past annoucement regarding this collaboration.

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June 16, 2005

ARTstor at Upcoming American Libraries Association Conference

ARTstor is pleased to announce that there will be an ARTstor Hospitality Suite at the upcoming American Library Association (ALA) Annual conference in Chicago. We want to encourage you to stop by with any questions you may have about ARTstor.

The suite will be located in the Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel on 2233 S. Martin L. King Drive. There will be signs in the lobby or flyers available at the concierge desk with the suite number. Representatives from our User Services and Library Relations teams will be in the suite to meet with anyone interested in learning more about ARTstor. The suite will be open at the following times:

  • Saturday, June 25, 2005: 10:00am-1:00pm
  • Sunday, June 26, 2005: 11:00am-5:00pm
  • Monday, June 27, 2005: 9:00am-11:00am

We will offer a 45 minute ARTstor demonstration each day in the suite at the following times:

  • Saturday, June 25, 2005: 11:00am
  • Sunday, June 26, 2005: 3:00pm
  • Monday, June 27, 2005: 9:00am

There will also be a Participants Meeting on Saturday, June 25th, 2005 from 2:00-3:30pm in the Morton Auditorium at the Art Institute of Chicago. The Art Institute is located at 111 South Michigan Avenue and is on the conference shuttle route. The meeting is open to all ARTstor participants and we hope that you will be able to join us. You are welcome to drop in but if possible, we ask that you RSVP to userservices@artstor.org in advance.

Please do not hesitate to contact us should you have any questions. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago.

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June 13, 2005

Samuel H. Kress Foundation and ARTstor Collaborate

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation and ARTstor are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement to collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of approximately 1,200 art works formerly belonging to the Kress Collection but, through a singular act of philanthropy, presently distributed among ninety institutions in thirty states around the country.

From the mid-1920s to the end of the 1950s, Samuel Henry Kress (1863-1955) and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation (est. 1929) amassed one of the most astonishing collections of European Old Master paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts ever assembled through the efforts of a private individual. Even more remarkable was the manner in which the Kress Collection was shared with the American people. In the largest single donation of European art from the Kress Collection, 1,800 works of art were donated to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The National Gallery of Art’s Kress Collection contains 376 Old Master paintings, 94 sculptures, 1,307 bronzes and 38 drawings. All of the rest of the Kress Collection – another 1,300 pieces – was distributed across the continent. 700 Old Masters were given to regional museums in eighteen American cities, resulting in the Kress regional collections of twenty to sixty Old Masters that brought the first Italian paintings to many communities throughout the country. Another 200 paintings were divided into study collections for twenty-three colleges and universities; these Kress study collections helped introduce European art to institutions of higher learning. Major gifts of special collections were also bestowed on the Metropolitan Museum of Art (French porcelains and furniture, and a complete Robert Adam room with Gobelins tapestries), the Pierpont Morgan Library (drawings and illuminated manuscripts), and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (13 tapestries on designs by Rubens and Pietro da Cortona). Initiated by Samuel Kress in the early 1930s, the distribution of art was completed, under the guidance of his brother Rush Kress, by the Kress Foundation between 1947 and 1961.

Through the present collaboration, the approximately 1,200 Old Master paintings from the Kress Collection will be made available in digital form through ARTstor. Encompassing European art of the principal continental schools from the 13th to the early 19th centuries, the Kress Collection’s greatest distinction resides in the extraordinary abundance of its Italian pieces – more than 1,000 Italian paintings, 500 period frames, 1,300 small bronzes, medals, and plaquettes, and representative sculpture, drawings, and furniture. “The world’s most encyclopaedic collection of Italian painting may be that formed by Samuel H. Kress,” says Colin Eisler, Robert Lehman Professor of Fine Arts at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. “His original plan was to include works by every artist mentioned by Vasari but the grand design grew to include Italian artists’ works through the late eighteenth century. Had Kress’ gathering remained intact, it would have been the wonder of viewers and scholars alike for its unique, dazzling comprehensiveness.” Many of the greatest Italian artists – Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, Botticelli, Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Verrocchio, Raphael, Andrea del Sarto, Pontormo, Correggio, Bellini, Carpaccio, Giorgione, Titian, Lotto, Tintoretto, Veronese, Carracci, Bernini, Strozzi, Tiepolo, Guardi, Canaletto, and Bellotto – appear in the Kress Collection, as do numerous significant works by less familiar masters. The French school from the early Renaissance to Poussin, Claude, Watteau, Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Houdon, David, and Ingres, is richly represented. Art of German-speaking lands comes from the hand of Durer, Grunewald, Altdorfer, Holbein, and Cranach. Flemish and Spanish tastes intermingle through Petrus Christus, Bosch, Memling, El Greco, Rubens, Van Dyck, Zurbaran, and Goya.

In reaching this agreement, Marilyn Perry, President of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and Neil Rudenstine, ARTstor’s Chairman, expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating to use digital technologies to make the unique Kress Collection more broadly available for noncommercial educational and scholarly purposes. “Sharing the artistic patrimony of Europe with the people of America was the philanthropic vision of Samuel Kress and the Kress Foundation,” comments Dr. Marilyn Perry, President of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. “We are deeply gratified that the ARTstor initiative of the Mellon Foundation will make it possible to share these treasures even more widely.” Rudenstine adds, “We at ARTstor are delighted to be working hand in hand with the Kress Foundation – and with the scores of museums which, through Samuel and Rush Kress’s generosity, now care for Kress paintings – to make these extraordinary works of art more accessible to teachers, students and scholars. This partnership is further evidence of ARTstor’s strong commitment to engaging the museum community in our effort to build cohesive digital collections based on the needs of scholars.”

Since its creation in 1929, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation has devoted its resources almost exclusively to programs related to European art. In consequence, the Foundation’s activities have been of fundamental importance – and have established a record of philanthropy without equal – in three primary and related areas: the collection and distribution of works of European art to American museums, the preservation of significant monuments of European art and architecture, and the nurturing of professional expertise in art history and art conservation.

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June 10, 2005

Florentine Cultural Agencies and ARTstor Partner

ARTstor has reached an agreement with the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore and the Museo Opificio delle Pietre Dure (Florence, Italy). Through this agreement, ARTstor is supporting the rich photographic documentation of the recently restored bronze doors on the east side of the Florentine Baptistery, universally known as the “Gates of Paradise” (in Italian, “Porta del Paradiso”). The sculptural relief panels of the “Gates of Paradise,” produced during the second quarter of the fifteenth century by the great Florentine sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti (1378-1455), constitute one of the most important art works of the early Italian Renaissance. After more than twenty-five years of work, the restoration of Ghiberti’s famous “Gates of Paradise” is nearing completion. ARTstor is sponsoring the comprehensive photographic documentation of the Gates of Paradise in their newly restored state. This photographic campaign has produced nearly 700 stunning, detailed photographs of Ghiberti’s relief sculptures, all of which will be digitized and made available through ARTstor at the highest resolution.

“These splendid new photos finally allow Ghiberti’s work to be seen and studied as the three-dimensional, sculptural masterpieces they are,” according to Gary M. Radke, Professor of Fine Arts at Syracuse University and Curator for Exhibitions of Italian Art at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. “Never before have we been able to study Ghiberti’s works so clearly and in such exhaustive detail. Taken from a wide variety of angles and under lighting conditions that reveal the full subtlety of Ghiberti’s modeling and finishing, these images will transform thinking about Ghiberti for decades to come.”

The contents of this important archive will greatly enrich ARTstor’s value to a wide audience in the history of art and related fields, including especially students of Italian Renaissance art. In reaching this agreement, James Shulman, Executive Director of ARTstor, said, “The ‘Gates of Paradise’ are among the most glorious works of Italian Renaissance art, and the recent restoration of Ghiberti’s famous relief panels is one of the crowning achievements of scientific art conservation. ARTstor is delighted to be able to play a part in supporting this important work through rich, new photographic documentation, and we are equally pleased to make these stunning new images available to scholars, teachers, and students. We anticipate that our partnership with the relevant Italian authorities – the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore, Opificio delle Pietre Dure, and other Florentine cultural agencies – will lead to many further collaborations with Italian museums.”
The Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore was founded by the Florentine Republic in 1296 to oversee the construction of the new Cathedral and its bell tower. Since 1436, the year in which Filippo Brunelleschi’s famous cupola was completed and the Cathedral consecrated, the principal charge of the Opera has been to conserve the entire monumental complex. In 1777 it was further assigned responsibility for the Florentine Baptistery and in 1891 for the museum which had been created to house works of art that, over the years, had to be removed from the Cathedral and the Baptistery.

The Opificio delle Pietre Dure is an autonomous Institute of the Florentine Ministry for Cultural Heritage, whose operational, research and training activities find expression in the field of conservation of works of art. It is the seat of one of the Italian state conservation schools, of a museum displaying samples of its artistic semiprecious stone production, a scientific laboratory for diagnostics and research, a highly specialised library in the sphere of conservation, extremely rich archives documenting conservation projects, a research centre and a public climatology service. It is one of the largest institutions in Europe in this field, having at its disposal an interdisciplinary team of conservators, art historians, archaeologists, architects, scientific experts and documentalists.

You may also be interested in “A peek behind Ghiberti’s Florentine Baptistery Doors.

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June 7, 2005

Oxford University and ARTstor Reach Collaborative Agreement

Oxford University and ARTstor announced today that they had reached an agreement whereby Oxford University’s Bodleian Library and ARTstor will collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of approximately 25,000 high quality images of manuscript paintings and drawings from the Bodleian Library’s outstanding collection of medieval and renaissance illuminated western manuscripts.

With more than 10,000 volumes, the Bodleian Library’s Department of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts has one of the greatest collections of western medieval manuscripts in the world. In recent years, the Bodleian Library has – with support from the Getty Trust – been developing an Electronic Catalogue of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts. The present collaboration with ARTstor will build on the foundation laid through that important effort. Through this partnership, ARTstor will digitize virtually all of the illuminated manuscript leaves from Bodleian manuscripts through the 16th century, as well as selected 19th and 20th- century manuscripts in the medieval tradition. The project will also selectively include significant bindings, illuminated initials, and text pages. The present collaboration will make this rich body of visual material and related scholarship available online and at high resolution for the first time. The audience for these highly valued materials will include not only art historians and medievalists but also scholars, teachers, and students throughout the humanities and beyond, who will value having the ability to access, browse, and make rich educational and scholarly uses of this unique corpus of images.

In reaching this agreement, Richard Ovenden, Keeper of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts at the Bodleian Library, expressed his enthusiasm in collaborating with ARTstor and in using digital technologies to make this important scholarly resource more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes. “The Bodleian Library at Oxford is delighted to be working with ARTstor in making the tens of thousands of manuscript illuminations in our Department of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts more widely available to students and researchers in the field.” James Shulman, ARTstor’s Executive Director, expressed ARTstor’s keen interest in this partnership. “The Bodleian Library’s medieval and renaissance manuscript collections are legendary. We at ARTstor are delighted to help make their artistic content more readily available to scholars, teachers and students.”

The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford. It is also a copyright deposit library and its collections are used by scholars from around the world. In addition, the Bodleian consists of nine other libraries, in separate locations in Oxford: the Bodleian Japanese Library, the Bodleian Law Library, the Hooke Library, the Indian Institute Library, the Oriental Institute Library, the Philosophy Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House and the Vere Harmsworth Library.

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