Skip to Main Content

Blog

July 20, 2005

Collaborative Agreement Reached Between ARTstor and the National Gallery of Art

ARTstor is pleased to announce that it has reached an agreement with the National Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C.) to collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of the Foto Reali Archive, one of the most important photographic archives belonging to the National Gallery of Art Library’s Department of Image Collections.

The National Gallery of Art Library’s Department of Image Collections has unusually rich photographic archives. The Foto Reali Archive is among those most prized by scholars, and as such it is routinely consulted by art historians, art conservators and curators, historians of art collecting, and other scholars. Foto Reali was a Florentine photographic firm that surveyed private art collections as well as dealer inventories in Italy in the early twentieth century, often photographing the paintings in situ. Among the private collections represented in the archive are such key collections as those assembled by Harold Acton, Vittorio Cini, Alessandro Contini-Bonacossi, Luigi Grassi and Eugenio Ventura.

The contents of this important archive will greatly enrich ARTstor’s value to a wide audience in the history of art and related fields, especially students of Italian Renaissance painting. It closely complements the Sansoni Archive at the Frick Art Reference Library, concurrently being digitized for distribution through ARTstor. Everett Fahy, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman of the Department of European Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has studied the Foto Reali Archive intensively. He stresses the documentary value of these early photographs of Italian paintings. “Many of the early photographs of paintings belonging to dealers show the paintings before they were restored, often in their original frames,” says Fahy. “As many of the works are unknown even to specialists,” adds David Alan Brown, the National Gallery of Art’s Curator of Italian Paintings, “this vast image collection holds out the promise of exciting discoveries.”

In reaching this agreement, Neal Turtell, Executive Librarian, National Gallery of Art, expressed his enthusiasm in collaborating to use digital technologies to make these important scholarly resources more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes. “The National Gallery of Art is excited to make the unique contents of the Foto Reali Archive more accessible to the academic and museum community. Our collaboration with ARTstor is a natural outgrowth of Paul Mellon’s commitment to excellence in art historical research,” commented Turtell. James Shulman, Executive Director of ARTstor, adds, “The Foto Reali archive is a unique source of information on early collections of Italian paintings. ARTstor is delighted to be able to play a part in making it more easily accessible for scholarly and educational purposes.”

The Department of Image Collections of the Library at the National Gallery of Art is a study and research collection of images documenting European and American art and architecture. Established in 1943, the collection now contains almost 10 million black-and-white photographs, negatives, slides, and microform images of all aspects of Western art.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 12, 2005

ARTstor Announces Release of New Images, Formerly in the AMICO Library

ARTstor is pleased to announce the release into the ARTstor Digital Library of over 25,000 images, most of which were formerly a part of the AMICO collection. As of today, users of ARTstor will be able to view images provided by the following museums:

  • Asia Society
  • The Cleveland Museum of Art
  • Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College
  • The Frick Collection and Art Reference Library
  • George Eastman House
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • The Minneapolis Institute of Arts
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • Victoria and Albert Museum
  • The Walters Art Museum

To locate these images, which have been integrated into the Image Gallery and its browsing taxonomy, you can use “AMICO” as a keyword when searching. For best results, combine “AMICO” with additional search criteria, such as repository or creator name.
In early August, we anticipate releasing approximately 85,000 additional images from:

  • Dallas Museum of Art
  • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
  • Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • Library of Congress
  • Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art

We will make additional announcements when those images are available in the Library and will continue to keep you updated of additional releases of images and of new museum agreements as they are reached. For more information about our work on the AMICO project, please see our past annoucement regarding this collaboration.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 16, 2005

ARTstor at Upcoming American Libraries Association Conference

ARTstor is pleased to announce that there will be an ARTstor Hospitality Suite at the upcoming American Library Association (ALA) Annual conference in Chicago. We want to encourage you to stop by with any questions you may have about ARTstor.

The suite will be located in the Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel on 2233 S. Martin L. King Drive. There will be signs in the lobby or flyers available at the concierge desk with the suite number. Representatives from our User Services and Library Relations teams will be in the suite to meet with anyone interested in learning more about ARTstor. The suite will be open at the following times:

  • Saturday, June 25, 2005: 10:00am-1:00pm
  • Sunday, June 26, 2005: 11:00am-5:00pm
  • Monday, June 27, 2005: 9:00am-11:00am

We will offer a 45 minute ARTstor demonstration each day in the suite at the following times:

  • Saturday, June 25, 2005: 11:00am
  • Sunday, June 26, 2005: 3:00pm
  • Monday, June 27, 2005: 9:00am

There will also be a Participants Meeting on Saturday, June 25th, 2005 from 2:00-3:30pm in the Morton Auditorium at the Art Institute of Chicago. The Art Institute is located at 111 South Michigan Avenue and is on the conference shuttle route. The meeting is open to all ARTstor participants and we hope that you will be able to join us. You are welcome to drop in but if possible, we ask that you RSVP to userservices@artstor.org in advance.

Please do not hesitate to contact us should you have any questions. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 13, 2005

Samuel H. Kress Foundation and ARTstor Collaborate

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation and ARTstor are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement to collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of approximately 1,200 art works formerly belonging to the Kress Collection but, through a singular act of philanthropy, presently distributed among ninety institutions in thirty states around the country.

From the mid-1920s to the end of the 1950s, Samuel Henry Kress (1863-1955) and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation (est. 1929) amassed one of the most astonishing collections of European Old Master paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts ever assembled through the efforts of a private individual. Even more remarkable was the manner in which the Kress Collection was shared with the American people. In the largest single donation of European art from the Kress Collection, 1,800 works of art were donated to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The National Gallery of Art’s Kress Collection contains 376 Old Master paintings, 94 sculptures, 1,307 bronzes and 38 drawings. All of the rest of the Kress Collection – another 1,300 pieces – was distributed across the continent. 700 Old Masters were given to regional museums in eighteen American cities, resulting in the Kress regional collections of twenty to sixty Old Masters that brought the first Italian paintings to many communities throughout the country. Another 200 paintings were divided into study collections for twenty-three colleges and universities; these Kress study collections helped introduce European art to institutions of higher learning. Major gifts of special collections were also bestowed on the Metropolitan Museum of Art (French porcelains and furniture, and a complete Robert Adam room with Gobelins tapestries), the Pierpont Morgan Library (drawings and illuminated manuscripts), and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (13 tapestries on designs by Rubens and Pietro da Cortona). Initiated by Samuel Kress in the early 1930s, the distribution of art was completed, under the guidance of his brother Rush Kress, by the Kress Foundation between 1947 and 1961.

Through the present collaboration, the approximately 1,200 Old Master paintings from the Kress Collection will be made available in digital form through ARTstor. Encompassing European art of the principal continental schools from the 13th to the early 19th centuries, the Kress Collection’s greatest distinction resides in the extraordinary abundance of its Italian pieces – more than 1,000 Italian paintings, 500 period frames, 1,300 small bronzes, medals, and plaquettes, and representative sculpture, drawings, and furniture. “The world’s most encyclopaedic collection of Italian painting may be that formed by Samuel H. Kress,” says Colin Eisler, Robert Lehman Professor of Fine Arts at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. “His original plan was to include works by every artist mentioned by Vasari but the grand design grew to include Italian artists’ works through the late eighteenth century. Had Kress’ gathering remained intact, it would have been the wonder of viewers and scholars alike for its unique, dazzling comprehensiveness.” Many of the greatest Italian artists – Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, Botticelli, Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Verrocchio, Raphael, Andrea del Sarto, Pontormo, Correggio, Bellini, Carpaccio, Giorgione, Titian, Lotto, Tintoretto, Veronese, Carracci, Bernini, Strozzi, Tiepolo, Guardi, Canaletto, and Bellotto – appear in the Kress Collection, as do numerous significant works by less familiar masters. The French school from the early Renaissance to Poussin, Claude, Watteau, Chardin, Boucher, Fragonard, Houdon, David, and Ingres, is richly represented. Art of German-speaking lands comes from the hand of Durer, Grunewald, Altdorfer, Holbein, and Cranach. Flemish and Spanish tastes intermingle through Petrus Christus, Bosch, Memling, El Greco, Rubens, Van Dyck, Zurbaran, and Goya.

In reaching this agreement, Marilyn Perry, President of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and Neil Rudenstine, ARTstor’s Chairman, expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating to use digital technologies to make the unique Kress Collection more broadly available for noncommercial educational and scholarly purposes. “Sharing the artistic patrimony of Europe with the people of America was the philanthropic vision of Samuel Kress and the Kress Foundation,” comments Dr. Marilyn Perry, President of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. “We are deeply gratified that the ARTstor initiative of the Mellon Foundation will make it possible to share these treasures even more widely.” Rudenstine adds, “We at ARTstor are delighted to be working hand in hand with the Kress Foundation – and with the scores of museums which, through Samuel and Rush Kress’s generosity, now care for Kress paintings – to make these extraordinary works of art more accessible to teachers, students and scholars. This partnership is further evidence of ARTstor’s strong commitment to engaging the museum community in our effort to build cohesive digital collections based on the needs of scholars.”

Since its creation in 1929, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation has devoted its resources almost exclusively to programs related to European art. In consequence, the Foundation’s activities have been of fundamental importance – and have established a record of philanthropy without equal – in three primary and related areas: the collection and distribution of works of European art to American museums, the preservation of significant monuments of European art and architecture, and the nurturing of professional expertise in art history and art conservation.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 10, 2005

Florentine Cultural Agencies and ARTstor Partner

ARTstor has reached an agreement with the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore and the Museo Opificio delle Pietre Dure (Florence, Italy). Through this agreement, ARTstor is supporting the rich photographic documentation of the recently restored bronze doors on the east side of the Florentine Baptistery, universally known as the “Gates of Paradise” (in Italian, “Porta del Paradiso”). The sculptural relief panels of the “Gates of Paradise,” produced during the second quarter of the fifteenth century by the great Florentine sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti (1378-1455), constitute one of the most important art works of the early Italian Renaissance. After more than twenty-five years of work, the restoration of Ghiberti’s famous “Gates of Paradise” is nearing completion. ARTstor is sponsoring the comprehensive photographic documentation of the Gates of Paradise in their newly restored state. This photographic campaign has produced nearly 700 stunning, detailed photographs of Ghiberti’s relief sculptures, all of which will be digitized and made available through ARTstor at the highest resolution.

“These splendid new photos finally allow Ghiberti’s work to be seen and studied as the three-dimensional, sculptural masterpieces they are,” according to Gary M. Radke, Professor of Fine Arts at Syracuse University and Curator for Exhibitions of Italian Art at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. “Never before have we been able to study Ghiberti’s works so clearly and in such exhaustive detail. Taken from a wide variety of angles and under lighting conditions that reveal the full subtlety of Ghiberti’s modeling and finishing, these images will transform thinking about Ghiberti for decades to come.”

The contents of this important archive will greatly enrich ARTstor’s value to a wide audience in the history of art and related fields, including especially students of Italian Renaissance art. In reaching this agreement, James Shulman, Executive Director of ARTstor, said, “The ‘Gates of Paradise’ are among the most glorious works of Italian Renaissance art, and the recent restoration of Ghiberti’s famous relief panels is one of the crowning achievements of scientific art conservation. ARTstor is delighted to be able to play a part in supporting this important work through rich, new photographic documentation, and we are equally pleased to make these stunning new images available to scholars, teachers, and students. We anticipate that our partnership with the relevant Italian authorities – the Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore, Opificio delle Pietre Dure, and other Florentine cultural agencies – will lead to many further collaborations with Italian museums.”
The Opera di Santa Maria del Fiore was founded by the Florentine Republic in 1296 to oversee the construction of the new Cathedral and its bell tower. Since 1436, the year in which Filippo Brunelleschi’s famous cupola was completed and the Cathedral consecrated, the principal charge of the Opera has been to conserve the entire monumental complex. In 1777 it was further assigned responsibility for the Florentine Baptistery and in 1891 for the museum which had been created to house works of art that, over the years, had to be removed from the Cathedral and the Baptistery.

The Opificio delle Pietre Dure is an autonomous Institute of the Florentine Ministry for Cultural Heritage, whose operational, research and training activities find expression in the field of conservation of works of art. It is the seat of one of the Italian state conservation schools, of a museum displaying samples of its artistic semiprecious stone production, a scientific laboratory for diagnostics and research, a highly specialised library in the sphere of conservation, extremely rich archives documenting conservation projects, a research centre and a public climatology service. It is one of the largest institutions in Europe in this field, having at its disposal an interdisciplinary team of conservators, art historians, archaeologists, architects, scientific experts and documentalists.

You may also be interested in “A peek behind Ghiberti’s Florentine Baptistery Doors.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 7, 2005

Oxford University and ARTstor Reach Collaborative Agreement

Oxford University and ARTstor announced today that they had reached an agreement whereby Oxford University’s Bodleian Library and ARTstor will collaborate on the digitization and distribution through ARTstor of approximately 25,000 high quality images of manuscript paintings and drawings from the Bodleian Library’s outstanding collection of medieval and renaissance illuminated western manuscripts.

With more than 10,000 volumes, the Bodleian Library’s Department of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts has one of the greatest collections of western medieval manuscripts in the world. In recent years, the Bodleian Library has – with support from the Getty Trust – been developing an Electronic Catalogue of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts. The present collaboration with ARTstor will build on the foundation laid through that important effort. Through this partnership, ARTstor will digitize virtually all of the illuminated manuscript leaves from Bodleian manuscripts through the 16th century, as well as selected 19th and 20th- century manuscripts in the medieval tradition. The project will also selectively include significant bindings, illuminated initials, and text pages. The present collaboration will make this rich body of visual material and related scholarship available online and at high resolution for the first time. The audience for these highly valued materials will include not only art historians and medievalists but also scholars, teachers, and students throughout the humanities and beyond, who will value having the ability to access, browse, and make rich educational and scholarly uses of this unique corpus of images.

In reaching this agreement, Richard Ovenden, Keeper of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts at the Bodleian Library, expressed his enthusiasm in collaborating with ARTstor and in using digital technologies to make this important scholarly resource more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes. “The Bodleian Library at Oxford is delighted to be working with ARTstor in making the tens of thousands of manuscript illuminations in our Department of Special Collections and Western Manuscripts more widely available to students and researchers in the field.” James Shulman, ARTstor’s Executive Director, expressed ARTstor’s keen interest in this partnership. “The Bodleian Library’s medieval and renaissance manuscript collections are legendary. We at ARTstor are delighted to help make their artistic content more readily available to scholars, teachers and students.”

The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford. It is also a copyright deposit library and its collections are used by scholars from around the world. In addition, the Bodleian consists of nine other libraries, in separate locations in Oxford: the Bodleian Japanese Library, the Bodleian Law Library, the Hooke Library, the Indian Institute Library, the Oriental Institute Library, the Philosophy Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House and the Vere Harmsworth Library.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
May 10, 2005

The University of Michigan, The American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA) and Artstor Collaborate

The University of Michigan, the American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA), and Artstor announced today that they had reached an agreement whereby the University of Michigan and Artstor will collaborate on the distribution through Artstor of approximately 13,000 high quality digital images from the University of Michigan slide distribution service’s “ACSAA Color Slide Project.” Spanning nearly 3,000 years of Southern Asian culture, the ACSAA Color Slide Project has been the primary source of teaching images in the field of Southern Asian art and architecture for thirty years.

The ACSAA Color Slide Project is a non-profit supplier of photographic materials of Southern Asian art. Since 1974, the Project has provided high quality yet modestly priced color slides of the art and architecture of India and other South and Southeast Asian countries (Nepal, Tibet, Burma, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, Pakistan, Afghanistan) to individuals and institutions for teaching and research purposes around the world.

This collaboration will make this rich body of visual material and related scholarship available online and at high resolution for the first time. The audience for these materials will include not only art historians but also scholars, teachers, and students throughout the humanities and social sciences, who will value having the ability to access, browse, and make rich educational and scholarly uses of this unique corpus of images. Through this agreement, the University of Michigan expects to make sets of the digital images available to individual scholars, here and abroad, as it has always done with its slide sets.

In reaching this agreement, Alex Potts, Professor and Chair of the History of Art Department at the University of Michigan, and Mary Beth Heston, President of ACSAA and Chair of the Art History Department at the College of Charleston, expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating with Artstor and in using digital technologies to make this important scholarly resource more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes. “The History of Art Department at Michigan is very glad to be working with Artstor in making a significant portion of the exceptionally rich visual archive of Asian material it administers more widely available to students and researchers in the field. Collaborating with the American Council for Southern Asian Art to bring the holdings of the ACSAA Color Slide Project to a wider audience is important for the educational mission of both our institutions,” said Professor Potts, expressing the University of Michigan’s enthusiasm for this collaboration. “ACSAA believes Artstor shares the original educational and scholarly objectives of ACSAA in assembling and distributing these images. Artstor will further our mission to provide an important resource for scholars, teachers and students by bringing this resource into the digital age,” Professor Heston adds on behalf of ACSAA. Max Marmor, Artstor’s Director of Collection Development, expressed Artstor’s keen interest in this partnership. “The ACSAA slides have been one of the key sources of teaching images in Asian art and architecture for decades. Making these very important images available to teachers and scholars in digital form through Artstor will significantly ease the transition to digital for hosts of teachers and students, while also adding a new dimension to the immensely important slide distribution projects at the University of Michigan and strengthening ACSAA’s key role in support of the study of Southern Asian Art.”

The ACSAA Color Slide Project is a not-for-profit service established by the American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA) at the University of Michigan in the mid-1970s. Since then the ACSAA Color Slide Project has functioned as a service to the educational community. The Project, which has benefited from the contributions of many individual photographers, concentrates on photographing and distributing, at an affordable price, slides of art objects from exhibitions, distinguished private collections, and the permanent collections of major American and South Asian museums. The project also photographs and distributes slides of major architectural sites that include sculptural monuments. For more information on the Project, see its website at http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/acsaa/acsaa.html.

The American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the study and awareness of the art of South and Southeast Asia. In addition to periodic symposia, ACSAA pursues these goals through various projects, including its bi-annual newsletter, bibliographies, and of course the ACSAA Color Slide Project. Since its incorporation in 1967, ACSAA has grown from its original fifteen members to an organization of some three hundred individuals and institutions.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
March 30, 2005

ARTstor at Art Libraries Society of North America conference

We wanted to let you know that there will be an ARTstor Hospitality Suite at the upcoming ARLIS conference in Houston. All participants and non-participants are invited to visit us at the Hilton Americas at 1600 Lamar Street. There will be signs in the lobby and fliers at the concierge desk with the suite number. Representatives from our User Services and Library Relations teams will be in the suite so there will be ample opportunities for training and learning more about ARTstor. We encourage you to schedule an appointment for training in advance.

There will also be an ARTstor Users Group Meeting on Monday, April 4 from 8:00-9:30am in Room 340 AB of the Hilton Americas. This is an open meeting and breakfast will be served. You are welcome to drop in but if possible we ask that you RSVP to userservices@artstor.org in advance.

Suite Hours:

  • Sunday, April 3, 2005: 12:00pm-5:00pm
  • Monday, April 4, 2005: 10:00am – 5:00pm
  • Tuesday, April 5, 2005: 9:00am- 2:00pm
  • ARTstor Demonstrations (45 minutes):
  • Sunday, April 3 2005: 4:00pm
  • Monday, April 4, 2005: 12:00pm
  • Tuesday, April 5, 2005: 9:00am

If you have any questions or would like to schedule a training session, please contact userservices@artstor.org. See you in Houston!

Continue Reading »

Posted in
February 28, 2005

ARTstor at Visual Resources Association Conference

We wanted to let you know that there will be an ARTstor Hospitality Suite at the upcoming Visual Resources Association conference in Florida. All participants and non-participants are invited to visit us in the Wyndham Miami Beach Resort at 4833 Collins Avenue. You will find us in the suite on Monday, March 7, 2005 from 10:00am to 5:00pm; Tuesday, March 8, 2005 from 10:00am to 5:00pm; and on Wednesday, March 9, 2005 from 10:00am to 4:00pm. There will be signs in the lobby and fliers at the concierge desk with the suite number. Representatives from our User Services and Library Relations team will be in the suite so there will be ample opportunities for training and learning more about ARTstor. We encourage you to schedule an appointment for training in advance.

There will also be a Participants Breakfast on Tuesday, March 8 from 7:00-8:30am in the Madrid Room at the Wyndham Miami Beach Resort. This meeting is open to all ARTstor participants and we hope that you will be able to join us. You are welcome to drop in but if possible, we ask that you RSVP to userservices@artstor.org in advance.

The agenda for the meeting is as follows:

  • Introduction & Welcome: James Shulman, Executive Director
  • Participation Update: Barbara Rockenbach, Assistant Director for Library Relations
  • User Services Update: Kimberly Harvey, User Services CoordinatorCollections Update: Max Marmor,Director of Collection Development
  • Hosting Pilot: James Shulman, Executive Director
  • Question & Answer Session: All ARTstor Staff

Finally, there will be an ARTstor Users Group Meeting on Tuesday, March 8, 2005 from 12:30-2:00pm. This meeting is being coordinated by Elisa Lanzi from Smith College and Tina Updike of James Madison University and is open to anyone who is interested in ARTstor.

To schedule a time for training or to RSVP for the Participants Meeting, please email userservices@artstor.org. See you in Miami!

Continue Reading »

Posted in
January 26, 2005

Institutional Hosting Pilot

In June 2004, ARTstor initiated a year-long pilot of its proposed institutional hosting service. This service will enable local institutional collections to be hosted by ARTstor and served back to the participating institution alongside ARTstor’s Charter Collection, and using ARTstor’s software environment and tools. Ten colleges and universities have been working with ARTstor to assess the usefulness of this service to institutions, as well as to evaluate the financial and organizational impact of hosting at each institution.

The ARTstor user community has expressed a great deal of interest and enthusiasm about the hosting service for several reasons: (1) hosting will allow institutions to supplement the images in ARTstor’s Charter Collection with additional images that meet the specific needs of an institution and its professors; (2) all hosted images will be retrieved via ARTstor’ tools and software, which means that local collections can utilize the searching, browsing, and zooming capabilities of the ARTstor software; (3) for many institutions, hosting will also provide organizational benefits, since ARTstor’s underlying database can function as a useful tool for the campus-wide management of images and data.

The ten institutions involved in the pilot, which include universities and colleges, were chosen for their diversity in the type of institutional collections, the size of those collections, and the media on which those institutional collections are stored. While some institutions elected to host art-related collections, many have contributed collections that represent a wide range of departments and disciplines, including biology, astronomy, maps of Africa, and Cuban Heritage objects.

Over the course of assessing the pilot, we are gathering data from institutions about current practices in image collection-building and management, and asking participants about the pedagogical impact of having local collections made more widely accessible alongside the ARTstor collections. ARTstor is working with the National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education (NITLE) and seven NITLE-member colleges on the formal assessment of the hosting pilot. NITLE has provided these colleges with funds to access ARTstor for the length of the pilot, and ARTstor is working with these schools to assess the financial and organizational impact of institutional collection hosting in an educational environment.

The hosting pilot project is scheduled to run through the summer. Once the results are complied and reviewed we will be announcing the next steps.

The institutions currently participating in the pilot are:

  • Bryn Mawr College
  • Denison University
  • DePauw University
  • Emory University
  • Grinnell College
  • Sewanee: The University of the South
  • Stanford University
  • University of Miami
  • Washington and Lee University
  • Williams College

Continue Reading »

Posted in