Skip to Main Content

Blog

January 31, 2019

Picturing the Little Ice Age

Pieter Brueghel the Elder. Return of the Hunters. 1565. Oil on oak panel. Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna. Image and data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Erich Lessing.

In the summer of 1675, Madame de Sévigné, a doyenne of letters, protested from Paris: “It is horribly cold… we think the behaviour of the sun and of the seasons has changed,” prescient witness to the phenomenon now referred to as the Little Ice Age. Over the last century, scientists and historians have gathered evidence of a prolonged period of global climatic volatility from the thirteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, culminating in a cooling trend in Northern Europe during the 1600s — frigid winters and wet, cold summers. As we bear our share of winter hardships, it might be comforting to gain some historical and pictorial perspective on the polar vortex.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
January 15, 2019

It’s a wrap: Artstor looks back at 2018

René Magritte. Golconda (Golconde). 1953. Image and data provided by The Menil Collection, Houston. © 2019 C. Herscovici, Brussels / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
René Magritte. Golconda (Golconde). 1953. Image and data provided by The Menil Collection, Houston. © 2019 C. Herscovici, Brussels / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Katharina Fritsch. Händler [Dealer]. 2001. Polyester and paint. Image and original data provided by Glenstone. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Peter Doig. Gasthof zur Muldentalsperre. 2000-2002. Oil on canvas. Image and original data provided by The Art Institute of Chicago. © Peter Doig. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019
Vera Lutter. San Marco, Venice XX: December 3, 2005. 2005. Gelatin silver prints. Image and original data provided by The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. © 2019 Vera Lutter / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Unknown, Chinese. Yongle Period, Ming Dynasty. Bowl. Early 15th century. Porcelain. Image and original data provided by the Philadelphia Museum of Art
Hemba People. Mwisi Wa So'o (Chimpanzee-Human Mask). 20th Century. Wood. Image and data provided by Williams College Museum of Art
Unidentified Artist, Indian. Icon of Jain Goddess, probably Jvalamalini. c. 17th-19th century. Copper alloy. Image and data provided by Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Charles Herbert Woodbury. Marine. c. 1910. Watercolor and gouache on paper. Image and original data provided by Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Sirhind, Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India. Mughal. Tomb (12) of Khwaja Muhammad Naqsband, Rauza Sharif Complex. 1702. Image and data provided by American Institute of Indian Studies. Photographer: D.P. Nanda
Hadım Atik Ali Pasha, commissioner. Atik Ali Pasha Mosque. Dome and eastern half-dome. 1496-1497. Istanbul, Turkey. Photographer: Gabriel Rodriguez, 2013. Image and data provided by the Media Center for Art History, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University

Over the past year we have enriched Artstor’s resources with global selections that travel through time and meander from Ming ceramics to Mughal palaces, illuminating history from the tells of Ancient Iraq through to contemporary installations. We have released 30 additional collections in the Artstor Digital Library (enhanced and new), including notable contributions that target the highly sought areas of Asian and contemporary art.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
December 18, 2018

New collection: Roger Brown, 800 images that transcend the everyday

Roger Brown. Thumbing in Fall. 1985. Oil on canvas. Image and data provided by the Roger Brown Study Collection, School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Roger Brown. Thumbing in Fall. 1985. Oil on canvas. Image and data provided by the Roger Brown Study Collection, School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Our thanks to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which contributed approximately 800 images of the artist’s work to the Artstor Digital Library.* The selection in Artstor encompasses the artist’s career, from 1970 through 1997, and includes paintings, mosaics, and mixed media.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
December 6, 2018

New collection: Pacita Abad, a woman of the world

Pacita Abad. Assaulting the eye with ecstasy. 1986. Acrylic, embroidery, buttons, mirrors on stitched and padded canvas. Image and data provided by © Pacita Abad Art Estate

Pacita Abad. Assaulting the eye with ecstasy. 1986. Acrylic, embroidery, buttons, mirrors on stitched and padded canvas. Image and data provided by © Pacita Abad Art Estate

Our thanks to the Pacita Abad Art Estate, which contributed 500 images of the artist’s work to the Artstor Digital Library.* The selection in Artstor illustrates the artist’s career from the 1970s to her final years in the 2000s.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
November 30, 2018

Explore an astronaut’s photographs in Artstor’s public collections

SS36375_36375_38441606

Richard H. Truly. S40-151-129 Washington, D.C.. 1991. Image and data courtesy Regis University Library.

Richard H. Truly was the first person to be launched into space on his birthday when he piloted the Space Shuttle Columbia on November 12, 1981. In 1989 he would become the eighth NASA Administrator, the first astronaut to hold the position. Two public collections in Artstor from Regis University document the astronaut’s fascinating career via papers and media.

Continue Reading »

November 26, 2018

Every dog has its 15 minutes: Andy Warhol’s dog photographs

Andy Warhol, Dog, 1982. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Andy Warhol, Dog, undated. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Andy Warhol, Dog, undated. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Andy Warhol, Dog, undated. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Andy Warhol, Dog, undated. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Andy Warhol, Dog, undated. Artwork and Image © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

When you see Andy Warhol’s name, his Pop Art paintings of Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, and Campbell’s soup cans probably spring to mind. But Warhol’s interests extended beyond fame and commerce, as evidenced in the photos he took to record his daily life. “A picture means I know where I was every minute,” the artist said. “That’s why I take pictures. It’s a visual Diary.”

Continue Reading »

Posted in