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August 25, 2020

11 open collections perfect for Hispanic Heritage Month

By now you know that Artstor’s Public Collections provide approximately 1.3 million freely accessible images and other materials from library special collections, faculty research, and institutional history materials. The collections are constantly growing, and as we browsed for Latin American content in preparation for Hispanic Heritage Month, we were delighted by what we found. Here are some notable highlights:

Clary. Conferencia Latinoamericana Sobre la Integracion de la Mujer en el Desarollo Economico y Social. 1977

Clary. Conferencia Latinoamericana Sobre la Integracion de la Mujer en el Desarollo Economico y Social. 1977. Image and data from Wofford College: The Lindsay Webster Collection of Cuban Posters.

Wofford College: The Lindsay Webster Collection of Cuban Posters
The collection features approximately 350 works created in Cuba from the revolution through the 2000s. Many of the posters focus on Cuba’s efforts to spread messages of the revolution worldwide and to inspire others in the fight against oppression stemming from the legacies of imperialism and colonialism, as well as posters focused on promoting Cuban national pride, conservation, production, and culture.

Dartmouth: Ediciones Vigia Collection
In 1985, a Cuban poet Alfredo Zaldivar and an artist Rolando Estevez established a literary forum for a group of Cuban artists in Matanzas, Cuba and called it Ediciones Vigía. For over twenty years now the goal for these artists has been to create beautiful handmade books. Through all of the social and political shifts, and even a severe paper shortage, the artists have found ways to create works of enormous artistry, imagination, and creativity by using found and recycled materials.

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August 25, 2020

Celebrating the diversity of Hispanic heritage

Luis González Palma. El árbol, 1993

Luis González Palma. El árbol, 1993. Image and data from Lehigh University Art Galleries Permanent Collection.

When tasked with explaining my cultural heritage I feel a mixture of excitement and trepidation; the term “Hispanic” captures such a wide spectrum of people and cultures. Plus, in a year of high racial tensions and unrest I worry that I am not being sensitive or inclusive to all my brown and black brothers and sisters.

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July 22, 2020

New: Open Artstor: Statens Museum for Kunst (National Gallery of Denmark)

Christine Løvmand. Flower piece. 1841.

Christine Løvmand. Flower piece. 1841. Oil on canvas. Image and data from Statens Museum for Kunst. CC0.

Artstor has published nearly 29,000 images from the Statens Museum for Kunst with the Creative Commons public domain dedication CC0, freely available to all. Open Artstor: Statens Museum for Kunst (National Gallery of Denmark) is part of an initiative to aggregate open museum, library, and archive collections across disciplines on the Artstor platform.

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July 1, 2020

Teaching and research with Artstor: 25 examples

Over the years, educators, librarians, and researchers at all levels, from secondary schools to graduate programs, have shared with us how they use Artstor in their teaching and research. We’ve gathered some of our favorites here, touching on topics as varied as medicine, ethnic studies, women’s studies, and more.

Would you like to share how you use Artstor? Leave a comment and we’ll follow up!

Unknown | Howard University students picket the National Crime Conference; Dec-1934 |Eyes of the Nation: A Visual History of the United States (Library of Congress)

Unknown photographer. Howard University students picket the National Crime Conference, December 1934. Eyes of the Nation: A Visual History of the United States (Library of Congress)

Washington’s secret city: cultural capital
Amber N. Wiley, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture, Tulane University

Race, identity, and experience in American art
Dr. Jennifer Zarro, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

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June 17, 2020

New: Two collections of contemporary art from the California College of the Arts

Peter Doig. 100 Years Ago, 2001. 2001.

Peter Doig. 100 Years Ago, 2001. 2001. Image and data from California College of the Arts. © 2020 Peter Doig / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London.

The California College of the Arts (CCA) has contributed nearly 8,500 images of international and American contemporary art to the Artstor Digital Library. This contribution provides deeper coverage of postmodern global art in Artstor, an area in high demand in our community.

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June 15, 2020

10 great reasons to use Artstor in your teaching

The Artstor Digital Library is used by educators in 1,900 institutions around the world–and with good reason. Here are just ten ways you can enhance your teaching with Artstor:

1. Take advantage of a wealth of images and primary sources to enhance most subjects.

2. Use with confidence: all images are rights cleared for education and research (and beyond in some cases!).

3. Make and share image groups for assignments and home study.

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May 6, 2020

Pandemics and epidemics

More than 2 million of the images in Artstor are now discoverable alongside JSTOR’s vast scholarly content, providing you with primary sources and vital critical and historical background on one platform. This blog post is one of a series demonstrating how the two resources complement each other, providing a richer, deeper research experience in all disciplines.

There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet always plagues and wars take people equally by surprise.
— Albert Camus, The Plague, 1948

Alfred Rethel. Dance of Death Death the Strangler.
Dance of Death: Death the Strangler. Alfred Rethel (German, 1816-1859). 1850. Woodcut. Credit: The Cleveland Museum of Art; http://www.clevelandart.org/ CC0
José Aparicio. Episode of Yellow Fever in Valencia. (Episode de la fièvre jaune à Valence).
Episode of Yellow Fever in Valencia (Épisode de la fièvre jaune à Valence). José Aparicio. 1804. Credit: Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/c/htm/Home.aspx
Tanjé, Pieter. A procession of flagellants carrying a canopy and a statue of the Virgin Mary through a town.
A procession of flagellants carrying a canopy and a statue of the Virgin Mary through a town. Pieter Tanjé. Etching, with engraving. Credit: Wellcome Collection; https://wellcomecollection.org/ CC BY 4.0.

Explore the full Pandemics and Epidemics image group in Artstor

The rapid rise of the COVID-19 pandemic1 is a stark reminder that humanity is still susceptible to infectious diseases. Despite the successes of modern medicine, communicable diseases continue to impact our health, our economies, and our communities.

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May 4, 2020

Our dogged companions

We at Artstor/ITHAKA are so devoted to our canines that we share a dogspotting channel that provides a steady stream of engaging pictures. During the crisis, as we isolate with our pets, the photos and anecdotes have proliferated. In tribute to our best friends who delight and support us during this time, we would like to highlight a few of our furry colleagues. Since this is Artstor, the temptation to call up artistic alter egos is irresistible so we are presenting our companions alongside their kindred spirits in art (perhaps more in essence than in precise likeness). No disrespect intended, since a comparison to a dog is the highest form of praise!

Enzo, in a rare moment, stands still was the catalyst (sorry dogs) for this approach. His quizzical, unsparing stare immediately conjured the bespectacled gaze of the great French painter Jean-Siméon Chardin, an artist who, in fact, featured dogs in several works.

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