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April 20, 2015

Help other faculty use images in teaching

curriculum_guides

Have you heard about Artstor’s Curriculum Guides project? Instructors around the world are curating sets of images from the Digital Library as an aid in teaching a variety of subjects.

Would you like to share your work with colleagues at institutions around the world? We are looking for faculty collaborators who teach in areas such as history, the social sciences, and cultural studies. If you are interested in taking part, please contact us at curriculumguides[at]artstor.org to learn more.

We look forward to hearing from you and encourage you to pass this on to your colleagues!

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April 17, 2015

Friday links: Musical abstractions, giant cat mask, and the Tate in Minecraft

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • The new Twitter account Medieval Reactions has become extremely popular by pairing images from medieval manuscripts with goofy captions. Brilliant, right? Depends on how you look at it.
  • According to its website, Minecraft is a game in which “brave players battle terrible things in The Nether, which is more scary than pretty.” Not your idea of a good time? Thanks to the Tate, you can now also virtually visit the museum and enter famous artworks.
  • Manet paints Monet. And he disses Renoir.
  • An artist and his students at the Japan School of Wool Art created a giant realistic cat mask. Everyone at Artstor now wants one.
  • This artist with synesthesia makes paintings depicting the colors and textures she sees when she hears music. Listen while you look.
  • The Ford Theater—where Abraham Lincoln was shot 150 years ago this week—has created a stunning website featuring the stories of people who lived through the event.

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April 15, 2015

Taking our time: Artstor’s first Slow Art Day

Slow_art2

We recently wrote about Slow Art Day, and were quite happy to finally try it ourselves this past weekend.

To recap, a recent study estimated that museumgoers spend an average of just 17 seconds looking at an individual artwork. To combat this habit, Phil Terry, CEO of Collaborative Gain, started a movement in which a volunteer host selects art at a gallery or museum, participants meet at the venue to examine several works for five to ten minutes each, and then discuss their impressions over lunch or coffee.

FRICK1

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April 10, 2015

Friday links: privacy vs freedom of expression, guerrilla art, and cats

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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April 6, 2015

A vision, a board, and a plan: an interview with Elizabeth Barlow Rogers

 

Artstor has recently released more than 1,100 photographs of Central Park from the Foundation for Landscape Studies in the Digital Library. We celebrated the occasion by speaking with Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who founded the organization in 2005 and serves as its president.

Ms. Rogers is a pivotal figure in the history of Central Park. She was appointed the Park’s administrator in 1979, charged with overseeing all aspects of daily operations. She was instrumental in founding the Central Park Conservancy in 1980, and she guided the Park’s extraordinary restoration. Rogers led the Conservancy as president until 1996, and she is now a life trustee. Her influence extends far beyond New York City, and she is frequently consulted by groups in other cities and countries desiring to form park conservancies modeled on the one for Central Park.

After stepping down from the presidency of the Central Park Conservancy, Rogers founded the Cityscape Institute. She subsequently created the Garden History and Landscape Studies curriculum at the Bard Graduate Center in 2002. She is the author of several books, including The Forests and Wetlands of New York City (1971), Rebuilding Central Park: A Management and Restoration Plan (1987), Landscape Design: A Cultural and Architectural History (2001), Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation Across Two Centuries (2011), and Learning Las Vegas: Portrait of a Northern New Mexican Place (2013).

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April 6, 2015

The flowers of Delmarva

This post has been updated to include new information about Artstor’s public collections, formerly made available on Shared Shelf Commons.
Franklin C. Daiber, Peony. UD Library: Franklin C. Daiber Botanical Collection

Franklin C. Daiber, Peony. UD Library: Franklin C. Daiber Botanical Collection

The Delmarva Peninsula gets its name from the three states it’s a part of: DELaware, MARyland, and VirginiA. You could say Delmarva is technically an island, since you have to cross one of five bridges (one of them being the 20-mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel) to get across the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, but since the canal is man-made it’s still considered a peninsula.

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April 5, 2015

Now available: Additional images from the Foundation for Landscape Studies

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

The Artstor Digital Library and the Foundation for Landscape Studies are now sharing more than 1,100 additional images, the large majority of them documenting the renovation of New York City’s Central Park in the 1980s.

This brings the collection’s total in the Digital Library to 8,000 images from around the world. These images provide an overview of landscape studies, encompassing all cultural landscapes, including gardens, parks, cities, suburbs, rural areas, and the humanized wilderness. A subset of the collection consists of engravings from rare books dating from the 16th through early 20th century.

The Foundation for Landscape Studies is a nonprofit with a mission to foster an active understanding of the importance of place in human life. To this end, the foundation initiates collaborative projects with other organizations, institutions, and individuals that promote and advance landscape history and historic landscape design, theory, and practice.

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April 5, 2015

Now available: Andean ceramics from the Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)

unknown (Moche), Vessel (left view), 100-800 C.E., Peru, north coast. Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)

Unknown (Moche), Vessel (left view), 100-800 C.E., Peru, north coast. Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)

Artstor and the Fowler Museum at UCLA are now making nearly 3,200 images of Andean ceramics collection available in the Digital Library.

The Fowler Museum’s collections include more than 120,000 art and ethnographic objects and approximately 600,000 archaeological objects from ancient, traditional, and contemporary cultures around the world.

The Fowler Museum at UCLA was established in 1963 to consolidate the collections of non-Western art and artifacts dispersed throughout the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles. As one of the top university museums in the United States, the Fowler initiates research projects, fieldwork, publications, exhibitions, and public programming to enhance the understanding and appreciation of global arts cultures.

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April 3, 2015

Friday links: Lit-up Rothko, nude museum tour, gluten-free art

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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April 2, 2015

Hopping through cultures: the rabbit in art

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Easter is around the corner, and with it comes the inevitable barrage of images of the Easter bunny. The strange thing is that the only mentions of rabbits in the Bible are prohibitions against eating them in the Old Testament. So what gives?

The underlying idea is that rabbits are connected to the idea of rebirth—not only do they reproduce prodigiously, at one time they were believed to reproduce asexually. The connection of rabbits to rebirth also occurs in non-Christian societies: The Rabbit in the Moon (instead of our Man in the Moon) is a familiar symbol in Asia, and was part of Aztec legend, tying the idea of rabbits to a “rebirth” every night. But other qualities of rabbits and hares also get highlighted in folklore, including their mischievous side, playing the role of cunning tricksters in Native American and Central African mythologies.

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