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Blog Category: Around the web

September 19, 2014

Friday links: forged pictures and old jokes

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Art comes to life

In Orange County there are few traditions as long-running as the Pageant of the Masters, a two-month-long display devoted to “living pictures” in which costumed actors pose as well-known works of art. Here’s why it’s worth a serious look.

And from living pictures we move to a picture that turns to life in this short from 1901, featuring one of the earliest instances of special effects.

The artist’s essence

Recent studies suggest that “art is seen as imbued with the person’s soul/essence,” which might explain why original artworks move us more than reproductions.

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September 12, 2014

Friday links: smiling paintings, creepy GIFs, and more

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Say cheese!

An investigation into why we so seldomly see people smiling in painted portraits.

DIY apocalypse

A different angle in which to see Albrecht Dürer: self-publishing pioneer.

Undead photos

Artist uses historic archival photographs from the Library of Congress to create funny—and sometimes creepy—animated GIFs.

And we were torn about this one: the cute and horrifying tableaux of an amateur Victorian taxidermist.

Better than the waiting room

A visit to a museum dedicated to art and medical objects in St. John’s Hospital in Bruges.

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September 5, 2014

Friday links: neanderthal art, renaissance paintings, vampires, and more

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Bon appétit

Just in time for lunch: The New York Public Library has scanned more than 17,000 menus from 1851 to 2008.

Abstraction avant la lettre

Cross-hatched engravings found in a cave in Gibraltar are being called the first known examples of Neanderthal rock art by scientists who studied the site.

Too hot

A masterpiece by Raphael was warped by faulty air conditioning.

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August 29, 2014

Friday links: a week of revelations

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

This week brought us one surprising revelation after another:

A Robert Rauschenberg artwork led to the solving of a decades-old murder mystery.

Using the position of the sun and the time of high tide, an astrophysicist pinpointed the birth of Impressionism to the nearest minute.

Researchers discovered buried evidence of more than 15 late Neolithic monuments around Stonehenge.

Apparently, drawings can predict how intelligent a 4-year old will be ten years later.

And this sent shockwaves around the office: Hello Kitty is not a cat.

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August 22, 2014

Friday links: technology and the humanities, Mona Lisa’s theft, arty picnics

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

Unwitting models

The New Yorker spoke to two of the women in Garry Winogrand’s famous “World’s Fair, New York City” (1964) about what it was like to be in an iconic photograph. The Winogrand retrospective is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until September 21, and you can find more than 100 of his photographs in the Artstor Digital Library.

Technology and the humanities

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August 15, 2014

Friday links: unknown Warhols, Pollock’s passport, Vesalius’s birthday

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

Andy Warhol’s silver screen

Warhol made hundreds of 16mm films, but many are virtually unknown because of their fragility and the difficulty of projecting them. Now the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and the Museum of Modern Art are digitizing nearly 1,000 of them.

“Occupation: artist”

Jackson Pollock’s passport reveals a little-known fact about the famed painter: “right index finger partly missing.”

De humani corporis fabrica

The University of Toronto’s Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library is celebrating the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius, the anatomist whose illustrated book revolutionized renaissance medicine. (You can see 253 of the woodcuts in Northwestern University’s Vesalius Anatomical Illustrations collection in Artstor.)

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August 8, 2014

Friday links: Dodgy Da Vincis, animated critics, art in unexpected places

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

Dodgy Da Vincis

“Kemp also noted that he is sent 12 to 20 supposed ‘Leonardos’ each year.” Inside the murky world of unauthenticated Da Vincis.

The difficulties of abstract art

This cracked us up: The Critic, an Oscar-winning cartoon narrated by Mel Brooks.

Think you know more than Brooks’s critic? Prove it by hanging these abstract paintings in the right orientation. It’s harder than we expected!

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August 1, 2014

Friday links: masterpieces, doghouses, maps, and more

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Here are some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

What makes a masterpiece?
What makes the Mona Lisa a masterpiece–Is it the mysterious smile? The innovative composition? The chiaroscuro and the sfumato? Perhaps. Or maybe it’s a matter of the “mere-exposure effect” and “cumulative advantage.”

Color test 
Art history majors, could you recognize an artwork by its colors? Take the Tate’s color palette challenge to find out. We didn’t score too well–we guessed all of them were Damien Hirst spot paintings.

Royal doghouse
We love this wonderful collection of 18th-century doghouses, particularly the one stamped with the mark of Marie Antoinette’s royal furniture maker. (You did read our recent post about Marie Antoinette herself, right?)

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July 25, 2014

Friday links: Beatrix Potter, Ad Reinhardt, Vermeer, and more

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Here are some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

The woman behind the rabbit

The works of Beatrix Potter, author of The Tale of Peter Rabbit and one of the most successful writers of all time, recently came into the public domain in many countries around the world. The Public Domain Review explores the complex woman behind the warm-hearted stories.

Ice cream with an abstractionist

New York School painter Ad Reinhardt, principally known for his ascetic black monochromes, was also the creative director for trade magazine Ice Cream Field. The Smithsonian Institute’s Archives of American Arts shares one of his light-hearted covers.

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