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Blog Category: Around the web

November 18, 2016

Around the web: pinkest pink, a huge bed, and, yes, Van Gogh

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web, 1871. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

This month’s recommended reading, divided into three semi-useful categories:

Inspiring

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October 21, 2016

Around the web: from Dalí’s cookbook to Mongolian wrestling

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web, 1871. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Some stories we’ve been reading this month:

  • O Brazil first showed up on maps in the 14th century. For the next five centuries its size and shape often morphed, its location wandered from Ireland to North America, and its name varied. Which is not so weird considering it never existed.
  • Finally, you can cook conger eel of the rising sun and frog pasties–Salvador Dalí’s surreal cookbook is being reprinted!

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September 23, 2016

Around the web: from the Pre-Raphaelites to monkey paintings

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web

Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web, 1871. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Some stories we’ve been reading this month:

Visual arts

  • Artists’ model Jane Morris served as muse to the Pre-Raphaelites, married one and became the undying love of another–and was a fascinating person all around.
  • Zoos make money selling paintings made by animals. Are they art?
  • For unknown reasons, René Magritte cut up a painting into four pieces and reused the canvas for new works. Conservators recently discovered one of the pieces–but there’s still one missing.
  • Paul Klee’s response to crashing fighter planes during WWI was, uh, unique.
  • One of the leading experts on Degas has changed his long-held (and combative!) stance and now thinks that a long-disputed plaster of the artist’s “Little Dancer” is indeed an earlier model of the famous sculpture.
  • Not sure which of the stories behind this hyper-realistic sculpture is true, but it doesn’t matter because the piece itself is unbelievable.
  • Is Edward Hopper’s gloomy painting Nighthawks optimistic? Watch the video.

Books

Archaeology

  • A decorated floor uncovered in the buried ruins of an ancient synagogue in Israel may depict a legendary meeting with Alexander the Great. Even if it’s not Alexander, the mysterious mosaic itself is great.
  • Archaeologists at Turkey’s neolithic site of Çatalhöyük have unearthed an intact complete female figurine.
  • Earlier this year, the Metropolitan Museum installed a monumental statue of Athena Parthenos from Pergamon on special loan from the collection of the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. Watch how they did it.

Technology

Miscellanea

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September 2, 2016

Friday Links: Munch smudge, banned hands, and bookstore pets

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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August 26, 2016

Friday Links: gigantic artwork, mysterious book, and secret libraries

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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August 19, 2016

Friday Links: saving a giant fiberglass chicken–and other important stuff

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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August 12, 2016

Friday Links: King Arthur’s birthplace, Dan Flavin unplugged, and an ‘I Love Lucy’ makeover

LINKMAN4Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • Using ground-penetrating radar, structures from the dark ages have been located, including–possibly–King Arthur’s birthplace?
  • Is a light installation by Dan Flavin still art when the power is off?
  • Bet you didn’t see this coming: How Viennese portraiture of the early 20th century can strengthen our understanding of the relationship between art and science.
  • Can’t get to the Netherlands to celebrate the quincentenary of its native son Hieronymus Bosch? Brush up on your knowledge and explore “The Garden of Earthly Delights” from home!

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August 5, 2016

Friday Links: books and drugs and rock n’ roll

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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July 29, 2016

Friday Links: clown painting collection and Stonehenge replica need homes

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • It started out as a joke… Meet the couple trying to sell their large collection of clown paintings. Sadly, there is not enough wall space in our office.
  • Foamhenge is a one-to-one scale replica of Stonehenge–made of foam. For the past twelve years it’s been one of the biggest attractions to the town of Natural Bridge in Virginia, but the property will be repurposed as a state park and the sculpture needs a new house. Sadly, there’s not enough room in our offices.
  • It goes without saying that we’re big supporters of digitization, but a professor in the history of cartography points out that no matter how detailed a scan is, “As soon as you turn a primary source into an image, you start to lose something.”

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July 22, 2016

Friday Links: Dr. Seuss’ insomnia paintings and the recipient of Van Gogh’s ear

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • Sound Homer Simpson makes when he realizes his mistakes, three letters, starts with D. A 91-year-old woman has been questioned by police after she filled in the blanks in a piece of modern art based on a crossword puzzle.
  • It’s not that we’re happy that Dr. Seuss suffered from insomnia, but we love the hundreds of artworks he created on those sleepless nights, many of which were kept private until his death.
  • We’re finally coming to terms with the fact that we’re including a Van Gogh and/or Mona Lisa link pretty much every week. This time around we give you the newly revealed name of the mystery woman who received Van Gogh’s ear.

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