Alec Hartill of Hartill Art Associates, Inc., Artstor, and the California Digital Library announced today that they had reached an agreement to collaborate on the archiving, digitization and distribution of approximately 20,000 high quality slides, created by both Alec and Marlene Hartill of Hartill Art Associates, Inc. over the past 26 years. The images reproduce architecture and the built environment from antiquity to the present, and include thousands of details of architectural sculpture, mosaics and stained glass. Under the agreement, the California Digital Library has purchased an archival set of the slides, which will be housed at one or more University of California campus libraries and made available for noncommercial educational and scholarly purposes. Artstor is digitizing those slides, and the digital images will be incorporated into noncommercial educational resources supported, respectively, by Artstor and the University of California.

In reaching this agreement, Alec Hartill, Artstor, and the California Digital Library expressed their enthusiasm in collaborating to preserve this important educational resource and in using digital technologies to make it more broadly available for noncommercial pedagogical and scholarly purposes.

Artstor was created in 2001 as a nonprofit initiative of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and is now an independent non-profit that seeks to make available a digital library of art images for noncommercial educational and scholarly uses. Alec Hartill will continue to license and sell sets of his slides and will license the digital images for noncommercial and commercial purposes.

The California Digital Library partners with the 10 UC campuses in a continuing commitment to apply innovative technology to managing scholarly information. Organizationally housed at the UC Office of the President in Oakland, CA, the CDL provides a centralized framework to efficiently share materials held by UC, to provide greater and easier access to digital content, and to join with researchers in developing new tools and innovations for scholarly communication.