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Blog Category: Highlights

April 25, 2012

Celebrate Mother’s Day with Artstor

Edward S. Curtis | Assiniboin Mother And Child, 1896-1926 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Happy Mother’s Day! The holiday is celebrated in May in dozens of countries around the world. In honor of mothers everywhere, we have assembled our favorite mother and child images from the Digital Library spanning a wide variety of cultures and eras.

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April 25, 2012

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

Harry Clifford Fassett | Woman standing in front of thatched hut belonging to Johnnie Toga, a chief, Neifau village, Vavau Island, Tonga Islands, 1899-1900 | Image and data from National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

May is the month to celebrate the heritage of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. The cultures, history, religion, architecture, and art of the continent of Asia are well represented in the ARTstor Digital Library, and you can find a full guide in our ARTstor Is… Asian Studies post; resources for Asian-Pacific content are also plentiful, but scattered throughout many collections and require a little more diligence.

Vanuatu; Malakula Island, Mbotgote | Helmet Mask, 19th-20th century | Image and data from: The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A quick way to find content in the Digital Library from a specific country is by going to the Browse area in the lower left corner of the search page and clicking Geography. Considering that Asia-Pacific encompasses the Pacific islands of Melanesia (Fiji, New Caledonia, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu), Micronesia (Guam, Kiribati, Marianas, Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, and Wake Island), and Polynesia (American Samoa and Samoa, Cook Islands, Easter Island, French Polynesia, Hawaiian Islands, Midway Island, New Zealand, Rotumas, Tonga, and Tuvalu), this might be a little time consuming, so here are some hints:

The main repositories of Asian-Pacific images in ARTstor include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which features art and artifacts from many of the regions listed above, the Peabody Museum of Natural History (Yale University), which has archaeological and ethnographic objects, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University), which has anthropological objects, and Magnum Photos, which includes contemporary photographs of New Guinea by Burt Glinn and Philip Jones Griffiths, of the Marshall Islands by Chris Steele-Perkins, Samoa by Alex Webb, the Cook Islands by Trent Parke, and Easter Island by Thomas Hoepker.

Solomon Islands | Kundu players at Mapiri for dukduk dance | Yale University: Peabody Museum of Natural History

Also of note is Cook’s Voyages to the South Seas (Natural History Museum, London), which includes 1,600 images of botanical and zoological illustrations associated with Captain James Cook’s expeditions to the South Pacific in the 18th century, and Thomas K. Seligman: Photographs of Liberia, New Guinea, Melanesia and the Tuareg people which, as its title states, includes field photography of New Guinea and Melanesia. Also fruitful, The Native American Art and Culture (National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution) includes a dozen fascinating photographs of Fiji in 1900 by Charles Haskins Townsend, and the Fowler Museum, the Dallas Museum of Art Collection, the Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Smith College Museum of Artall include art and artifacts from different cultures in Asia Pacific.

Johann Georg Adam Forster | Rufous Night Heron, 1774 | Image and original data provided by Natural History Museum, London

And don’t miss Teaching with ARTstor: Re-historicizing Contemporary Pacific Island Art by Marion Cadora, a graduate student at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Enjoy the celebrations and don’t forget to visit the Library of Congress’ official Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month site!

Polynesian | Easter Island (Rapa Nui); view of unfinished moai statues on slopes of Rano Raraku volcano | 10th-12th cent. | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. artres.com / artres.com

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April 2, 2012

April is Jazz Appreciation Month!

Jean Dubuffet. Grand Jazz Band (New Orleans), 1944. Image and original data provided by the The Museum of Modern Art. © 2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Happy Jazz Appreciation Month! While the attributes of jazz are difficult to describe without getting technical, the key element that ties together its many sub-genres, from swing to bebop to avant-garde, is improvisation—or as Louis Armstrong put it, “Jazz is music that’s never played the same way once.”

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January 26, 2012

Artstor Is… Black History

Black History Month is observed every February in the United States and Canada. What better time to remind our readers of the many excellent resources on the topic available in the Artstor Digital Library?

Jacob Lawrence, American, 1917-2000 | In the North the Negro had better educational facilities | The Museum of Modern Art | © 2008 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Black history:

Image of the Black in Western Art A systematic investigation of how people of African descent have been perceived and represented in Western art spanning nearly 5,000 years.

Magnum Photos: Contemporary Photojournalism Some of the most celebrated and recognizable photographs of the 20th century and contemporary life, documenting an astounding range of subjects, including hundreds of major figures and events in contemporary black history.

Eugene James Martin Vibrant abstract works by African American artist Eugene James Martin, including paintings on canvas, mixed media collages, and pencil and pen and ink drawings.

The Schlesinger History of Women in America Collection Professional and amateur photographs documenting the full spectrum of activities and experiences of American women in the 19th and 20th centuries, including a significant amount of portraits of African American women.

Smithsonian American Art Museum Works of art spanning over 300 years of American art history, including selections from a collection of more than 2,000 works by African American artists.

Jacob Lawrence | In the North the Negro had better educational facilities; The Migration of the Negro panel no. 58, 1940-41 | The Museum of Modern Art | © 2008 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Johannes Segogela, Apartheid's Funeral, Sculpture, 1994. Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)
James Conlon, Photographer | Dogon Dance of the masks (2008) | Sangha (Dogon Region), Mali
Bruce Davidson | Gordon Parks, 1970 | Image and original data provided by Magnum Photos | ©Bruce Davidson / Magnum Photos
Unknown Artist | Frederick Douglass, ca. 1855 | Image and Data from The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Eugene James Martin | Untitled, 1980 | Image and original data provided by Suzanne Fredericq | © 2008 Estate of Eugene James Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

African art and culture:

Richard F. Brush Art Gallery (St. Lawrence University) West African textiles from Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, and Cape Verde.

Herbert Cole: African Art, Architecture, and Culture (University of California, Santa Barbara) Field photography of African art, architecture, sites, and culture from Nigeria, Ghana, the Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, and Kenya, as well as photographs of African objects in private collections around the world.

James Conlon: Mali and Yemen Sites and Architecture Images of sites and architecture in Djenné, Mopti, Bamako, Segou, and the Dogon Region in Mali.

Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles) The arts of many African nations, including Angola, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire), Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Republic of Benin, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The museum also has significant holdings of African diaspora arts from Brazil, Haiti, and Suriname.

Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University Images of African art, such as textiles, costumes, basket and beadwork, weapons, tools, and ritual objects.

Christopher Roy: African Art and Field Photography Images of West African art and culture, including ceremonial objects and documentation of their social context, use, and manufacture from the rural villages and towns of the Bobo, Bwa, Fulani, Lobi, Mossi, and Nuna peoples in West Africa—primarily in Burkina Faso, but also in Ghana, Nigeria, and Niger.

Thomas K. Seligman: Photographs of Liberia, New Guinea, Melanesia, and the Tuareg people Images of the Tuareg people, a nomadic people of the Sahara who live in countries such as Mali, Niger, Nigeria, and Burkina Faso, as well as photographs of sites and people in Liberia, New Guinea, and Melanesia.

James Conlon, Photographer | Dogon Dance of the masks (2008) | Sangha (Dogon Region), Mali

For more teaching ideas, visit the Digital Library and click on “Teaching Resources,” where you can search for image groups that include Art History Topic: African Art and Interdisciplinary Topics: African and African-American Studies, as well as a case study, “Sweet Fortunes: Sugar, Race, Art and Patronage in the Americas” by Katherine E. Manthorne, The City University of New York. Also, visit Artstor’s Subject Guides page to download a guide to African and African-American Studies in Artstor.

New: Artstor and Black History Month, featuring additional resources!

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January 24, 2012

Artstor visits Downton Abbey

Sir John Lavery | Lila Lancashire | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston | Image and data from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Two things have been tearing through the Artstor staff recently – a nagging cold that seems to be felling us department by department, and a fascination with the British television show Downton Abbey.

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies
Designer: Mervyn Macartney and manufacturer: W. Hall for Kenton and Co | Desk, 1891| Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
William Morris | Tudor Rose Pattern Printed Fabric Mfr. No. 23591, design date: unknown | Image and data from The Museum of Modern Art
Left: Callot Soeurs and Madame Marie Gerber | Evening Dress, 1914 | The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Right: Evening Dress, 1909-1911 | The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Sir John Lavery | Lila Lancashire | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston | Image and data from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
J. & J. Slater | Evening Shoes, ca. 1910 | Image and original data from the Brooklyn Museum | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Robert Adam | Culzean Castle; south façade, 1777-90 | Maybole, Strathclyde, Scotland | Image and original data provided by Brian Davis

The series follows the lives of an aristocratic family and their servants in a fictional Yorkshire country estate. The first season is set before the outbreak of World War I, beginning with news of the sinking of the Titanic, while the second series opens with the Great War. The Artstor Digital Library has enough relevant images to keep us busy until the next episode: The Metropolitan Museum of Art has an impressive collection of turn of the century furniture and household accessories, such as this mahogany desk designed by Mervyn Macartney, as well as dazzling examples of dresses, hats (including a “motoring” cap!), shoes, and accessories from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Brooklyn Museum Costumes, including these ever-so-tasteful satin evening shoes; the Foundation for Landscape Studies features images of Le Bois des Moutiers, an extraordinary Edwardian era-garden designed by English landscape architect Gertrude Jekyll and architect Edwin Lutyens; the Museum of Modern Art, Architecture and Design Collection gives us this beautiful printed fabric from William Morris; and of course there are countless examples of art from the period (we chose a painting of Lila Lancashire by Sir John Lavery from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston because it reminds us of Lady Edith Crawley). And while we weren’t able to find Downton Abbey itself (actually the Highclere Castle in Hampshire), a search for castle within Brian Davis: Architecture in Britain leads to a satisfying selection of similarly imposing buildings.

Let us know if you find anything else in the Artstor Digital Library that reminds you of Downton Abbey or its characters – but please, no spoilers!

Left: Callot Soeurs and Madame Marie Gerber | Evening Dress, 1914 | The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Right: Evening Dress, 1909-1911 | The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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November 22, 2011

Happy Thanksgiving from Artstor

The Artstor staff is hurrying to wrap up projects before the long Thanksgiving weekend that starts this Thursday. The holiday is officially celebrated in the United States every year on the fourth Thursday of November.

Making Medicine | Making Medicine drawing of mounted hunters pursuing a deer, having flushed a turkey and chicks from cover, 1875 | National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

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October 27, 2011

Danse macabre

Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum Narren [death figure wearing foolscap and robe and holding out a string of bells clasping hand of jester; from La danse des morts , 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Continuing our spooky Day of the Dead/Halloween theme, we now present you with a slide show of the Danse Macabre. The Dance of Death was an allegory that began in the Middle Ages (possibly in response to the ravages of the black plague) in which death dances with people from all walks of life; it was meant to remind us that no matter our social station, life is fleeting and death inevitable.

The etchings in this slide show were made in the mid-18th century by Jacques-Antony Chovin based on prints by Matthäus Merian from a century before. They come to us from the Harry Ransom Center (University of Texas at Austin). Search for Chovin’s name in the ARTstor Digital Library to see the accompanying text, which includes dialogues between death and her victims.

Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum Narren [death figure wearing foolscap and robe and holding out a string of bells clasping hand of jester]; from La danse des morts , 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum König [death figure blowing horn and leading a king by the arm]; from La danse des morts, 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zur Königin [death figure with snake around its neck leading a queen by a waist sash]; from La danse des morts, 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum Blinden [death figure with moustache and goatee and wearing a feathered hat holds staff of blind man and extends scissors to guide dog's leash]; from La danse des morts, 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum Koch [death figure carrying a spit with chicken over his shoulder and leading a stout man who carries a spoon and pitcher]; from La danse des morts, 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Jacques-Antony Chovin | Tod zum Ritter [death figure wearing armor and holding a sword tripping a knight in armor]; from La danse des morts, 1744 | Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Looking for more creepy stuff? Try these posts:

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September 28, 2011

Focus on the telephone

Siemens & Halske A.G., Munich, (Manufacturer), Telephone, 1955. Image and data from: The Museum of Modern Art

The initial entry of our new Focus series presents a chronicle of the telephone using some of the numerous collections in the Artstor Digital Library that center on history.

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September 23, 2011

Welcome to the first day of Autumn

By Lucy Sawyer

Autumn has arrived in New York City and there are signs of it everywhere. The leaves are turning shades of red, orange, and gold, and when I stroll under the trees I look out for acorns falling. Outside of the city the changes are more striking. Before long the leaves will be piling up.

Vincent van Gogh, Large Plane Trees, 1889. This image and data was provided by The Cleveland Museum of Art.

When I think of fall, I picture vivid colors and dramatic light. Different artists come to mind, but one of my favorites is Vincent Van Gogh because of his use of color and his bold brushstrokes. Last year I got the opportunity to see some of his works in person at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and I keep a few postcards of his work posted up next to my computer.

This particular work by Van Gogh was painted on a cold day in November in Sainte-Rémy in southern France. He painted the golden leaves of the large plane trees and the laborers working beneath them on a piece of cheap linen fabric; zoom into the image in ARTstor to see the pattern of red diamonds on the linen showing through where the paint is thinner. It is fantastic to see these types of details in a work by an artist I truly enjoy.

What other images make you think of fall?

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September 9, 2011

Remembering 9/11

It’s been several years since the attacks on 9/11, but the events refuse to be confined to history. They continue to shape life and discourse in New York City, the United States, and the world, and the subject touches on disciplines as varied as social studies, journalism, political science, international relations, religious studies, economics, and civics. The Artstor Digital Library offers extraordinary images that provide many angles through which this complex episode can be considered.

A dazed man picks up a paper that was blown out of the towers after the attack of the World Trade Center, and begins to read it. ©Larry Towell / Magnum Photos. Image and original data provided by Magnum Photos

Dozens of images of the attack on the World Trade Center are available in the Magnum Photos collection, which also includes photographs of New York City in the following days and subsequent commemorations such as the Tribute of Light at Ground Zero on the second anniversary of the attacks. The collection also features magnificent views of the World Trade Center from the 1970s to the 1990s.

The event and its ensuing developments brought forth a wide range of reactions; these are represented in the Digital Library with works by contemporary artists, from the elegiac National Tribute Quilt in the American Folk Art Museum to searingly critical pieces by renowned political artist Hans Haacke in Contemporary Art (Larry Qualls Archive).

There are also glimmers of wonder among the many solemn images. A particularly touching piece is a Mexican retablo commissioned in gratitude for the survival of a loved one who was working in the Twin Towers during the attack.

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