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Blog Category: Primary and secondary schools

February 26, 2013

If I Knew Then What I Know Now

Pantheon; Interior view #1 | 118-126 CE | QTVR Panoramas of World Architecture (Columbia University) | Visual Media Center; learn.columbia.edu

Pantheon; Interior view #1 | 118-126 CE | QTVR Panoramas of World Architecture (Columbia University) | Visual Media Center; learn.columbia.edu

By Dana Howard

True confession: I was a sporadic—and inattentive—user of the Artstor Digital Library. My high school was a fairly early adopter of Artstor. I used it a lot on those early years, but as I had more and more of my slides “in the can,” I stopped paying attention to the changes taking place in the Digital Library.

I would periodically run to Artstor when I was asked to do presentations at the last minute, (I found the ability to do a quick download of Image Groups to PowerPoint very helpful), but for the most part I was too busy to explore new tools and new collections as they were announced. I think I was typical for a high school user; I was busy teaching and felt constantly bombarded with new resources elsewhere.

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June 18, 2012

Teaching with Artstor: Enhancing Children’s Literature with Artstor Images

Jacob Lawrence | The migration gained in momentum, 1940-41| Image and original data provided by The Museum of Modern Art | © 2008 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Margaret Teillon
Volunteer educator
Wachovia Education Resource Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art

From a very early age children love to read, be read to, and look at pictures in books. Recognizing the joy children bring to picture books, I have developed teaching materials using selected children’s literature combined with Artstor images. My goal is to enhance literacy instruction and provide an interdisciplinary method of teaching social studies, language arts, and art appreciation. For the youngest students, I have enhanced books such as Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown; and for elementary students have developed images for Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport. Included in each enhanced book is an OIV presentation and image palette with accompanying quotes from the text, and Web links to additional creative lessons. Teachers and homeschool educators have borrowed these materials for their own students.

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May 16, 2011

Teaching with Artstor: Teaching Shapes, Colors and Size to Young Children

Jacquelyn DeLombard

Beginnings Pre-School owner/teacher, Philadelphia Museum of Art Teacher Resource Center volunteer

Several weeks ago, the pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children from Beginnings Learning Center were at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) for one of the five lessons they attend during the school year. For the program, “Museum Looks and Picture Books,” PMA had sent the book, A Chair for my Mother, to school for the children to read prior to their visit, and now the class was following the guide to the American Wing to look at and discuss chairs. All of a sudden a child yelled, “Look! There’s Chuck Close! I want to go look at the rectangles and squares!”

Mark Rothko, No. 13 (White, Red on Yellow)1958. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Mark Rothko, No. 13 (White, Red on Yellow)1958. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art. © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jean (Hans) Arp, Objects Arranged According to the Law of Chance, 1930. The MoMA. © 2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Jean (Hans) Arp, Objects Arranged According to the Law of Chance, 1930. The MoMA. © 2009 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
ordered by Sultan Mehmed II, Topkapi Palace; Outer Court; Tiled Kiosk interior,Istanbul, Turkey, 1473. Image and original data provided by Walter B. Denny
ordered by Sultan Mehmed II, Topkapi Palace; Outer Court; Tiled Kiosk interior,Istanbul, Turkey, 1473. Image and original data provided by Walter B. Denny
Various quiltmakers, Surprise Quilt Presented to Mary A. Grow, 1856. American Folk Art Museum
Various quiltmakers, Surprise Quilt Presented to Mary A. Grow, 1856. American Folk Art Museum

Obviously the children not only knew their shapes, but also were very familiar with Chuck Close, who had previously been the artist of the month in their classroom, and thanks to Artstor’s zoomable images were very aware of the shapes he used in his work.

Children are taught to recognize and classify objects around them according to the attributes of shape, size, and color. These are the basics for nearly all learning that follows: writing, reading, mathematics, and even common household tasks like matching their socks or putting away their toys. For years preschool teachers have collected picture files from magazines, calendars and discarded posters and artwork because, next to a concrete object, an image is the clearest way to teach a young child something new. With the images from Artstor, the teacher is able to use works of art to teach very young children the simplest concepts of shape, size, and color, and continue to the more complex as children are ready for additional attributes or combinations thereof. At the same time, the children are almost incidentally learning the names of the works of art and their creators.

With the images projected in front of them, they can create their own shapes in a variety of media: paint, shaving cream, chocolate pudding, or catsup. They can compare what they see in the images to things found in their own classroom: rectangular windows, circular tables, and the rhythm band triangle. On the way home they will see traffic signs and understand what they mean by the shape long before they can read the words. (Of course everything in the preschool environment is labeled, giving them the opportunity to compare the word to the object.) So when the children recognized the Chuck Close painting AND the shapes in it at the museum, the teacher knew they really understood what they had been taught.

This essay was a 2011 Artstor Travel Awards winner.

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April 10, 2010

Teaching with Artstor: Proportion and perspective for K-12

Yona Friedman, Spatial City, project Perspective, 1958-59

Yona Friedman, Spatial City, project Perspective, 1958-59. © 2007 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Proportion and Perspective
Steven Wills, Coordinator, Wachovia Education Resource Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

This image group is meant to supplement a lesson in a middle-school math class that deals with measurement and proportion — usually in the context of geometry. There are several purposes of the image group, specifically:

  • to help visual learners see how the concepts discussed in class can be applied;
  • to help answer the question: “Why do we have to learn this?” (A frequent question in a math class); and
  • to help show the connections between math and science and math and art, thus helping to build an interdisciplinary approach to teaching.
Constantinople, Christ the Saviour in Chora, Vault; Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple; detail of Joachim, Anne, Mary, High Priest Zacharias, and the Holy of Holies, c. 1310-21. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/
Catena (Vincenzo di Biagio), The Adoration of the Shepherds, probably after 1520. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Diagram Demonstrating Filippo Brunelleschi’s Perspective Technique from a Lost Painting of the Battistero di San Giovanni. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com; (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Albrecht Altdorfer, Saint Sebastian Altar; Christ before Caiphas, c. 1509-1516. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/
Albrecht Durer, Madonna with the Monkey, circa 1498
Albrecht Durer, Madonna with the Monkey, circa 1498. The Illustrated Bartsch

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July 21, 2006

ARTstor announces New Initiative with Museum Education Departments

ARTstor is pleased to announce a new initiative that is designed to help museum education departments work with K-12 teachers in their communities as a means of integrating the study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula.

Museum education departments at participating museums will be able to create presentations using images of art works and other materials depicted in the ARTstor Library. The presentations can be stored on the OIV tool, an offline presentation tool created by ARTstor, and then given to K-12 teachers working with those museum education departments for use in the classroom.

Museum education departments and teachers accessing images of art works through OIV can zoom in on images, display images together to compare and contrast individual images, view the data associated with the images, and create classroom presentations with the images.

K-12 teachers using the OIV images do not have to be at institutions participating in ARTstor. Instead, teachers will be able to obtain OIV presentations from museum education departments. To obtain the OIV presentations, teachers will need to follow a few simple steps. More details about those steps can be found below.

We hope this initiative, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate the work of museum education departments with teachers in their communities, and will help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen.

How will this work?
Museum educators work closely with K-12 teachers to prepare students for class visits to the museum. They also seek ways of integrating study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula. ARTstor, a resource currently available and increasingly utilized by both communities, has been working on a way to facilitate the exchange of such information between these communities.

Slide sets of museum objects have been the traditional currency of the museum educator and teacher collaboration, but teachers are increasingly asking for digital images and museum educators are ready to relinquish the burden of the labor-intensive effort of duplicating, labeling and distributing the slides.

Over the past two years ARTstor has talked with museum educators about the use of ARTstor to support their work. Many were excited at the prospect of having ready access to works from other collections to supplement objects from their own museum as they prepare teaching units using ARTstor’s OIV. The problem, however, is that museums work with many schools that are not currently ARTstor participants and our terms and conditions did not allow them to save OIV presentations and give them to teachers on offline media.

We are pleased to announce a solution to this challenge. ARTstor now has a museum education department license which will allow participating museums to distribute images on OIV to K-12 teachers, even if the teacher’s school is a not an ARTstor participant.

How will this work? A teacher will need to come to the museum education department and sign an agreement. We have tried to make the process as simple as possible; the agreement is one page with the ARTstor terms and conditions of use attached. One copy of the signed agreement will be given to the teacher and another copy will be kept on file by the museum. After registering the teacher, the museum educator can provide previously prepared OIV presentations to the teacher, work with the teacher to a create custom presentations, and/or offer the teacher the opportunity to craft and save his/her own OIV presentations. The presentation can be stored on the teacher’s laptop or on offline media such as a CD or DVD. Teachers thus registered will be authorized to use the OIV presentations in their classrooms for 120 days and to renew their authorization by checking in and validating their registration at the museum.

We hope this development, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate their work with teachers and help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

You may download and review our License Agreement on the ARTstor website.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen

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April 17, 2006

ARTstor works with Museum Education departments and the K-12 Community

ARTstor is pleased to announce a new initiative that is designed to help museum education departments work with K-12 teachers in their communities as a means of integrating the study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula. Museum education departments at participating museums will be able to create presentations using images of art works and other materials depicted in the ARTstor Library. The presentations can be stored on the OIV tool, an offline presentation tool created by ARTstor, and then given to K-12 teachers working with those museum education departments for use in the classroom.

Museum education departments and teachers accessing images of art works through OIV can zoom in on images, display images together to compare and contrast individual images, view the data associated with the images, and create classroom presentations with the images. K-12 teachers using the OIV images do not have to be at institutions participating in ARTstor. Instead, teachers will be able to obtain OIV presentations from museum education departments. To obtain the OIV presentations, teachers will need to follow a few simple steps. We hope this initiative, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate the work of museum education departments with teachers in their communities, and will help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen, at na@artstor.org.

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July 9, 2003

ARTstor to retain Kris Wetterlund and Scott Sayre

ARTstor has begun actively exploring how and when it can best serve the K-12 community by retaining two consultants to develop a K-12 education plan. The two consultants, Scott Sayre and Kris Wetterlund, bring to the task a combined 25 years of experience in arts education including recent positions with the Art Museum Image Consortium (AMICO).

Sayre has over twelve years of experience guiding museums in the selection, development and application of educational and business technologies. He speaks internationally on the subject of art museums and technology, and has provided consulting services to a range of museums including the Art Institute of Chicago, High Museum of Art, Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art and the Walker Art Center. He was the Director of Media and Technology at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) where he formed the museum’s Interactive Media Group and led the development of a wide range of award-winning projects including the MIA and Walker Art Center’s educational portal “ArtsConnectEd” (www.artsconnected.org), the MIA’s web site (www.artsmia.org), and wide range of interactive multimedia programs installed in the museum’s galleries. He has a Doctorate in Education from the University of Minnesota and most recently served as AMICO’s Director of Member Services and US Operations.

Wetterlund has thirteen years of experience as an art museum educator, working in the MIA’s education department and at the Minnesota Museum of American Art as the Director of Education. Wetterlund has developed a number of online art resources and programs, including the MIA’s award-winning Get the Picture: Thinking about Photographs and a two year program to train K-12 teachers in Minnesota to use online art museum resources and technology in the classroom. She received her degree in art education from the University of Minnesota and is certified as a K-12 Minnesota teacher. Wetterlund most recently served as the Director of User Services for AMICO, where she advised educators on integrating AMICO digital art resources in curriculum and teaching.

Starting in July and continuing through early fall, Sayre and Wetterlund will be working on a plan for ARTstor’s approach to K-12 Education that will provide an overview of the K-12 landscape. This plan will investigate a number of opportunities, including whether there is a role for ARTstor in supporting art museums’ educational programs, integrating with art teacher training programs, and collaborating with federal, state and local arts education initiatives. The plan will also make recommendations regarding the types of tools and content that will best serve the needs of K-12 educators and students.

Sayre and Wetterlund will be working closely with ARTstor staff including Nancy Allen, ARTstor’s Director of Museum Relations, who noted the importance of this effort: “We hope that ARTstor can support teaching and learning about art in the K-12 community, but first we need to learn from museum educators and K-12 teachers about their needs and goals. We cannot imagine better partners to help shape our thinking and guide our planning than Kris and Scott with their impressive experience in education and museums.”

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