Skip to Main Content

Blog Category: Staff picks

August 19, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

I use this image a lot in demos because the zooming shows off paint and even the texture of the canvas dramatically. Klimt uses very rough thick canvas – almost like burlap – and you can see that and the thickness of the paint when you zoom in on details of this image… Reveals a lot about a work that everyone already thinks they know.

James Shulman, President

Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Gustav Klimt, The Kiss, 1907-1908. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
August 5, 2011

Artstor Staff Pick of the Week

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Ecstasy of Saint Theresa of Ávila (1645-1652), Cornaro Chapel, S. Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy. Source Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/c/htm/Home.aspx . Photo Credit: Erich Lessing/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

What could be more beautiful than a face that radiates with delight? I love the way this sculpture expresses the rapture of being alive.

Parastou Marashi, User Experience Designer

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 28, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Yakushi Nyorai: C. figure from Yakushi Triad, Golden Hall, Yakushi-ji, Nara (ca. 688 or 718) . Source data from Art Images for College Teaching

On my recent honeymoon trip to Japan, My wife and I spent an entire day in Nara. We were actually in the temple in which this image was taken, and I took a similar photo.

Omar A. Turner, Sales Engineer

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 22, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Diego Rivera | Flower Festival: Feast of Santa Anita (October 13, 1931) | Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller | The Museum of Modern Art

Before I even knew the history of the artist, I knew the picture.  When I was young, I saw a print of it, and instantly became intrigued. It reminded me of tradition, family and sacrifice.  I then researched the painting and Diego Rivera and have been a fan ever since.

– Nia Monroe, Human Resources Manager

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 15, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502. Source Image and original data prErich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archivesovided by /ART RESOURCE, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/c/htm/Home.aspx

Dürer’s Hare is the poster child for the species – everything you could ever hope for, and more.
– Nancy Minty, PT Metadata Assistant

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 7, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Jacques-Louis David The Death of Socrates (1787) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I vividly recall learning about David’s Death of Socrates during a history class in my freshman year of high school. I remember the warm glow of the slide as it appeared on the screen and my teacher’s detailed description of the work. On a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art shortly thereafter, I was amazed to see, firsthand, the manner in which David was able to convey the intensity of the moment—through composition and symbolism—all captured in a slick layer of paint on canvas. This was my first foray into the realm of art history.

Stephen Alsa, Library Relations Manager, Domestic

Continue Reading »

Posted in
July 1, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Artist unknown, Mexican Portrait of the Reverend Mother María Antonia de Rivera (c. 1775) Oil on canvas Philadelphia Museum of Art The Dr. Robert H. Lamborn Collection, 1903

I’m intrigued by this painting’s strange blend of austerity (the starched habit) and abundance (the enormous floral crown), accompanied by a mysterious gaze. I also really like the image and text combination—it’s so straightforwardly presented, but also very complexly coded. Plus, I just love nuns.

– Caroline Caviness, ARTstor Implementation Manager

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 24, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

I. M. Pei, Glass Pyramid in the Cour Napoléon of the Musée du Louvre (1985-1989). Photo credit: Erich Lessing/Art Resource, N.Y. http://www.artres.com/c/htm/Home.aspx

“I like the dimensions and perspective of the landscape as viewed from the interior of I.M. Pei’s glass pyramid.”

Wynston Francis, Senior Windows System Administrator

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 17, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Dora Maar, Pere Ubu (1936)

Dora Maar, Pere Ubu (1936). © 2007 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

I picked Maar’s image of a baby armadillo as Pere Ubu because it captures the wonderfully grotesque nature of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu character in what is otherwise a photograph of a cute, little animal.

Joseph Tew, PT Metadata Assistant

Continue Reading »

Posted in
June 10, 2011

ARTstor Staff Pick of the Week

Doll (1730-40). The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

“This charming little guy, with his red coat, white stockings, and blue waistcoat and britches is a really wonderful and whimsical spokesman for a fascinating moment in English and American history. Toys provide telling glimpses into the world of the child and reflect the values and fashions of the time and culture in which they are made. I like this particular fellow for the terrific lessons he offers in history, tradition, design and practical techniques.”

Tara Fleming, Executive Assistant to the Chairman, Human Resources Administrator

Continue Reading »

Posted in