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December 19, 2012

Now available: Contemporary architecture in Italy from ART on FILE

Ponte Sant'Angelo; overview of the bridge from the banks of the Tiber | 134 AD; Image 2011 | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE, www.artonfile.com

Ponte Sant’Angelo; overview of the bridge from the banks of the Tiber | 134 AD; Image 2011 | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE, artonfile.com

ARTstor Digital Library and ART on FILE partnered to release nearly 1,800 new direct capture photographs of buildings, built-environment projects, and landscape architecture in Italy. In their most recent ARTstor-sponsored campaign, photographers Colleen Chartier and Rob Wilkinson focused on architectural highlights in Rome and Venice, and captured views of the city of Florence.

Among the sites documented in Rome are the MAXXI Museum (Zaha Hadid, 2009), La chiesa di Dio Padre Misericordioso (Richard Meier, 2003), Museo dell’Ara Pacis (Richard Meier, 2006), and the Ponte della Musica (Buro Happold and Powell/Williams Architects, 2008). Highlights in Venice include: Torre Massimiliana Cultural Centre, Sant’Erasmo Island (C+S Associatti, 2004), Sculpture Garden for the 1952 Venice Biennale (Carlo Scarpa), La Giudecca (Cino Zucchi, 2002), Pinault Foundation, Punta della Dogana (Tadao Ando), Isola di San Michele (David Chipperfield), Ponte della Costituzione (Santiago Calatrava, 2010), Fondazione Querini Stampalia (Mario Botta, 2008), and the Sant’Erasmo Development (C+S Associati).

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April 21, 2012

On this day: The founding of Rome

She-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus, 16th century | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. artres.com / artres.com

Twin brothers Romulus and Remus founded Rome on April 21, 753 B.C. on the site where they were suckled by a she-wolf as orphaned infants.

Roman | Ara Casali | Museo Pio-Clementino | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
artres.com / scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

According to the legend, the twins were the sons of Rhea Silvia and the war god Mars. Fearing that they would claim his throne, Rhea’s uncle Amulius ordered them drowned in the River Tiber. Thanks to help from the river deity Tiberinus, the twins were safely washed ashore at the foot of the Palatine hill, where they were suckled by a she-wolf. They were rescued by a shepherd, who raised them as his own. Once grown, the twins killed Amulus and went on to found a town on the site where they had been saved. After a disagreement on the exact location of the site, Romulus killed by his brother and became ruler of the settlement, which he named “Rome” after himself.

The image of the 16th century sculpture of the she-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus comes to us from Art, Archaeology and Architecture (Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives), the Casali Altarpiece from the 2nd century C.E. comes from Italian and other European Art (Scala Archives), and Nicholas Mignard’s 17th century painting comes from the Dallas Museum of Art Collection. Search for Remus and Romulus to find many more related images, including the series of prints by Giambattista Fontana from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Collection.

Nicholas Mignard | The Shepherd Faustulus Bringing Romulus and Remus to His Wife, 1654 | Dallas Museum of Art | Image and data from the Dallas Museum of Art

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