Artstor provides faculty and students with a complete image resource in a wide array of subjects with the breadth and depth to add context and examine influences beyond the confines of your discipline.

Large headdress of a dancer. Mojo people, Bolivia. 20th CE. Musée du Quai Branly. Photo: MuPatrick Gries/Bruno Descoings. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.

World-class collections

With approximately 300 collections composed of over 2.5 million images (and growing), scholars can examine wide-ranging material such as Native American art from the Smithsonian, treasures from the Louvre, and panoramic, 360-degree views of the Hagia Sophia in a single, easy-to-use resource.

Artstor also supports study across disciplines, including anthropology from Harvard’s Peabody Museum, archaeology from Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Art Archives, and modern history from Magnum Photos, making it a resource for your whole institution.

Better than Google Images

The Artstor Digital Library provides straightforward access to curated images from reliable sources that have been rights-cleared for use in education and research — you are free to use them in classroom instruction and handouts, presentations, student assignments, and other noncommercial educational and scholarly activities.

And unlike results from Google or other search engines, our images come with high-quality metadata from the collection catalogers, curators, institutions, and artists themselves.

Wangechi Mutu, Yo Mama, 2003. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Wangechi Mutu, Yo Mama, 2003. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Jeremy Horner. Devotees at the Krishna Temple of Shriji, during Lathmar Holi. 2011.

Jeremy Horner. Devotees at the Krishna Temple of Shriji, during Lathmar Holi. 2011. © Jeremy Horner / Panos Pictures. Image and original data provided by Panos Pictures.

Deeper and more diverse

It’s easy to find related material beyond the canonical, most popular images from the same creator, topic, or time period. This makes the difficult task of building context and finding comparisons much simpler. Faculty can also ensure their students are working with the appropriate images by sharing their course material in image groups.

Designed for teaching and learning

The Artstor Digital Library is optimized to streamline workflows for your users, allowing them to create instant presentations by downloading up to 150 captioned images at once to PowerPoint, share work in image groups, export citations effortlessly, and prepare for exams using our new Quiz Mode.

An enhanced platform, a new IIIF image viewer

The redesigned Artstor interface provides users with a richer image-viewing experience, as well as more streamlined workflows for teaching and learning. Changes include our new IIIF image viewer with full-screen and side-by-side comparison modes, simplified image group sharing, and increased accessibility for users with disabilities.

Partnership with JSTOR

We are working to make Artstor images discoverable through JSTOR search. For JSTOR participants, this will make Digital Library content available where many scholars begin their research, providing new avenues for comparison and study, and increasing the value of an investment in Artstor.