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Blog Category: Collection release

July 22, 2020

New: Open Artstor: Statens Museum for Kunst (National Gallery of Denmark)

Christine Løvmand. Flower piece. 1841.

Christine Løvmand. Flower piece. 1841. Oil on canvas. Image and data from Statens Museum for Kunst. CC0.

Artstor has published nearly 29,000 images from the Statens Museum for Kunst with the Creative Commons public domain dedication CC0, freely available to all. Open Artstor: Statens Museum for Kunst (National Gallery of Denmark) is part of an initiative to aggregate open museum, library, and archive collections across disciplines on the Artstor platform.

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July 21, 2020

New: Additional images from the New-York Historical Society

Tiffany Studios. Landscape window.1910-1920.

Tiffany Studios. Landscape window. 1910-1920. Leaded glass. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.

Collection:
New-York Historical Society: Museum & Library

Content:
The New-York Historical Society has contributed new content to the Artstor Digital Library, more than 3,000 images bringing their total close to 23,000. Founded in 1804, the city’s oldest museum presents its history through varied works — American paintings, sculpture, prints and drawings, decorative arts and artifacts, and historical photographs. The current launch is highlighted by a comprehensive collection of luminous Tiffany glass and some cunning earthenware figurines that belonged to sculptor Elie Nadelman, who was among our earliest collectors of folk art.

Clara Driscoll. Tiffany Studios. Wisteria table lamp. 1910-1920.
Clara Driscoll. Tiffany Studios. Wisteria table lamp. Design, c. 1901. Leaded glass, bronze. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.
Frederick Wilson. Tiffany Studios. Good Shepherd with Landscape. 1909.
Frederick Wilson. Tiffany Studios. Good Shepherd with Landscape. 1909. Leaded glass, bronze. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.
Unidentified maker. Figurine of a squirrel. 1840-1880.
Unidentified maker. Figurine of a squirrel. 1840-1880. Lead-glazed red earthenware. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.
Unidentified maker. Figurine of a monkey 1860-1890.
Unidentified maker. Figurine of a monkey 1860-1890. Lead-glazed earthenware. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.
Unidentified maker. Figurine. 1840-1880.
Unidentified maker. Figurine. 1840-1880. Lead-glazed red earthenware. Image and data from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.

Relevance:
American culture & history, art & architecture, and urban studies.

*Totals may vary depending on domestic or international release.

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June 17, 2020

New: Two collections of contemporary art from the California College of the Arts

Peter Doig. 100 Years Ago, 2001. 2001.

Peter Doig. 100 Years Ago, 2001. 2001. Image and data from California College of the Arts. © 2020 Peter Doig / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London.

The California College of the Arts (CCA) has contributed nearly 8,500 images of international and American contemporary art to the Artstor Digital Library. This contribution provides deeper coverage of postmodern global art in Artstor, an area in high demand in our community.

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April 8, 2020

New: The Oregon College of Art and Craft

The Oregon College of Art and Craft has contributed more than 200 images of richly diverse works by faculty members to the Artstor Digital Library. The selection, which dates from 1986 to 2011, includes ceramics, fiber arts, works on paper, paintings, sculpture, installations, photographs and video.

Selected works reveal both creative and technical brilliance with results that are provocative, subversive, whimsical and beautiful.

The teapot project, an enduring rite of passage for students in metals is represented by two versions by Christine Clark who headed the department and conceived the project: Teapot with Pink, 2007, and Wire Teapot, 2010.

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March 19, 2020

New: Open Artstor: The Cleveland Museum of Art

Explore one of our finest museums virtually

Ogata Korin, follower of. Chrysanthemums by a Stream. Late 1700s - early 1800s.

Ogata Korin, follower of. Chrysanthemums by a Stream. Late 1700s – early 1800s. One of a pair of folding screens; ink and color on gilded paper. Image and data provided by The Cleveland Museum of Art. CCO 1.0.

In collaboration with The Cleveland Museum of Art and their comprehensive Open Access initiative, Artstor has published an expansive selection of works from this leading repository, freely available to all and with Creative Commons licenses in Open Artstor: The Cleveland Museum of Art. This is part of a new, free initiative to aggregate open museum, library, and archive collections across disciplines on the Artstor platform — already a destination for scholars using visual media. Incorporating more than 10,000 years of history and iconic works from every corner of the globe, this collection includes nearly 29,000 images offering considerable coverage of the museum’s encyclopedic collection — paintings from Nicolas Poussin to Georgia O’Keeffe, precious jewels and scrolls from China, Japanese screens and kimonos, African and Native American ritual attire and objects, pre-Columbian gold, photography, and much more.

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February 19, 2020

New: Additional images from Museo de Arte de Ponce

Cristóbal Hernández de Quintana. The Virgin of La Candelaria. 18th century.
Cristóbal Hernández de Quintana. The Virgin of La Candelaria. 18th century. Oil on canvas. Image and data provided by the Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferré Foundation, Inc.
Manuel Cuyàs Agulló. The American Landing at Ponce. 1898.
Manuel Cuyàs Agulló. The American Landing at Ponce. 1898. Oil on canvas. Image and data provided by the Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferré Foundation, Inc.
Frederick Sandys. Ysoude with the Love Philtre. 1870.
Frederick Sandys. Ysoude with the Love Philtre. 1870. Oil on panel. Image and data provided by the Museo de Arte de Ponce. The Luis A. Ferré Foundation, Inc.

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January 27, 2020

New: 45,000 open images from Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The Open Artstor: Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Collection is now available, featuring a selection of more than 45,000 images under Creative Commons licenses. This is part of a new, free initiative to aggregate open museum, library, and archive collections across disciplines on the Artstor platform — already a destination for scholars using visual media.

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January 14, 2020

New: 1,500 images from Panos Pictures

What’s new in the Artstor Digital Library?

G.M.B. Akash. A young Bede (Beday) girl near a river.
G.M.B. Akash. A young Bede (Beday) girl near a river. Image and data from Panos Pictures
Andrew Esiebo. At a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs). August 2018
Andrew Esiebo. At a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs), a group of boys are undergoing one of the several bonding and life skills activities. August 2018. Image and data from Panos Pictures.

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November 5, 2019

New in Artstor — Nearly 300 self-portraits by Joseph Stapleton

A unique offering from a second generation Abstract Expressionist

Joseph F. Stapleton. Look look. 1978

Joseph F. Stapleton. Look look. 1978. China marker, vellum. RISD Museum. Image and data provided by Robert Solomon Art.

Art historian Robert Solomon has just contributed the Joseph Stapleton: Self-Portraits collection to the Artstor Digital Library. Below, he provides a perspective on the artist and his significant output of self-portrait drawings.

Joseph Stapleton (1921-1994) was one of an estimated 400 artists who poured into New York City’s Tenth Street area following the close of World War II. According to historian Irving Sandler, they were attracted to this specific location by the presence of, among others, Willem de Kooning’s studio. Sandler referred to this group of artists born between 1920 and 1930 as Abstract Expressionism’s second generation. Over the next twenty years this second generation would be impacted by a variety of economic and social influences. These conditions would produce only a handful of names we recognize today.

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