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Blog Category: Teaching

May 8, 2018

Recognizing and teaching cultural appropriation for Asian-Pacific American Studies

Woman's Dress (Cheongsam)

Artist/maker unknown, Chinese. Woman’s Dress (Cheongsam). Early 20th century. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Bettison Bayliss, 1962-232-2.

Guest post by Raymond Pun

Raymond Pun is the first year student success librarian at the Henry Madden Library, Fresno State. He coordinates and organizes the first year information literacy program and student engagement activities across campus. He holds an M.L.S. from City University of New York – Queens College, M.A. in East Asian Studies, and B.A. in History from St. John’s University.

May is Asian-Pacific American (APA) Heritage Month. It’s an opportunity for all to reflect on and celebrate the cultures, traditions, achievements, and contributions of Asian and Pacific Americans in the United States. It’s also a chance to have meaningful conversations about important issues that affect APA communities, such as cultural appropriation–one critical topic of discussion that affects all ethnic groups. This concept is defined as the adoption of features from one culture, often minority ones, by members of the dominant or another culture. In APA experiences, we find that there are a number of examples of misappropriations occurring today in popular culture, music, images, performances, food, and clothing.

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April 13, 2018

2,000 Virtual Reality Panoramas of world architecture

Hagia Sophia

Isidore of Miletus, Anthemios of Tralles. Hagia Sophia, interior: Apse. 532-537, image: July 2013. Photography by Media Center for Art History, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University.

Have you ever wanted a better understanding of how an artwork or architectural detail was originally intended to be viewed?

Artstor’s Virtual Reality Panoramas are a wonderful option for viewing works in situ–no travel required. These 360-degree panoramas of world architecture allow you to navigate the interiors of cathedrals, mosques, palazzos, libraries, castles, and more. Using Comparison Mode, you can study artworks alongside panoramic views of the spaces in which they are installed.

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March 16, 2018

Using the new Artstor full screen viewer in the classroom

I recently found myself exploring the amazing world of netsuke using Artstor’s new comparison mode to perform that timeless task: double-slide projection. Boy, has it ever gotten easier!

The new image viewer allows you to project up to 10 images together, with the ability to zoom in on details of any of the images and add or remove images as needed. You can view detailed brushstrokes, or pan across large blocks of text in one of the primary source documents in Artstor. Try this yourself by opening a lecture image group, viewing the first image full screen, and clicking “compare.”

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February 16, 2018

Teaching about women’s suffrage with Artstor and JSTOR

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The Awakening. 1915. Henry Mayer. Image and original data courtesy Cornell University – PJ Mode Collection of Persuasive Cartography.

Join us for a webinar demonstrating research practices for novice researchers with the topic of the history of women’s suffrage in the United States from the mid-19th to early 20th century.

In honor of Women’s History Month, we will explore some useful collections alongside the rich content and tools available in both JSTOR and Artstor. We’ll show you how you can build a lesson around primary sources including images, historical documents, and contemporary essays debating universal enfranchisement, then connect them to academic research for context.

This webinar is scheduled for Tuesday, February 27, 2018 11:00 AM – 11:45 AM EST.

Register now

Can’t make the live event? All registrants will receive a link to the recorded session.

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September 8, 2017

Artstor and copyright: a guide

Screen Shot 2017-09-06 at 12.29.55 PM

Did you know that Artstor does not own the rights to the images in our collections? When you search Artstor you may be viewing images from multiple sources with differing permitted uses. Some collections might even be from your own institution’s archives and available only to you!

To help you better understand how you can use the images you find, we’ve created a guide to copyright and image use in the Digital Library. Read on to learn about the different sources of images you’ve been working with, and consult our LibGuide to learn the finer details of working with these images.

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July 19, 2017

Artstor sessions at the 2017 AP Annual Conference

AP Annual Conference
July 26-30, 2017
Washington, DC

Dana Howard, Artstor’s Senior Education & Outreach Manager for Secondary Schools, will be leading two sessions alongside fellow experts:

Enhancing Common Skill Sets among Studio and Art History Students
Saturday, July 29th, 10:15–11:30 AM

Dr. Virginia Spivey, Adjunct Professor of Art History, Theory & Criticism at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Artstor’s Dana Howard will show how art history and studio art instructors can benefit from a process of critique that brings the two practices into focus. In this session, participants will practice using critique as a method of art historical instruction and learn to design frameworks that show art history as an evolving body of knowledge rooted in European tradition and now understood in a global context.

Making Time to Teach: Curate and Organize Content for AP Art History
Saturday, July 29th, 2:30–3:45 PM

Rebecca A. Stone-Danahy, Upper School Visual Arts Educator at Ashley Hall, joins Artstor’s Dana Howard to discuss and demonstrate the process of curating research, images, websites, and resources for instructional use. Participants will learn how to use a variety of organizational tools in Google, Evernote, and Artstor to gather and store teaching content with tips on how to use with any LMS platform.

Learn more at the AP Conference website.

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February 27, 2017

Teaching the principles and elements of design with Artstor  (Part 2)

In our previous post I introduced our new Principles and Elements of Design resource (which you can find in Teaching Resources under Studio Art) and spoke about the elements of design; in this post, we look at the principles.

As with the series of Elements of Design image groups, each of these includes an explanatory essay with helpful links to further reading. It bears repeating here that my approach is but one of many; since an image group can be copied and then altered as needed, we thought it might serve as a valuable starting point for studio teachers.  

Once students can identify the elements of design, the next step is articulating how those elements support different principles of design. Seeing an element and being able to say how it functions in a composition requires an understanding of the principles of design.

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February 24, 2017

Teaching the principles and elements of design with Artstor (Part 1)

One of the most daunting challenges I faced teaching in a high school art program was developing a common language to articulate the principles and elements of design. Helping students hone those communication skills made critique easier but took a lot of time up front. When our faculty began to use the same terminology across the curriculum, students developed a comfort level with those terms and began using them more naturally in discussing their own work and the projects of their peers and heroes from the art world.

Long before I knew I was going to be building resources for teachers in Artstor, I was gathering images to help my own students “see and say” what they noticed in a work of art. My goal was to get them to articulate what principles were in effect and what elements supported those principles. After about ten years, I had a pretty robust image group to use for each. When I came to Artstor, I was determined to make ten functional groups of fewer than 24 images that other teachers could use to highlight specific elements or principles. I added favorites that colleagues suggested and included term definitions. Now, with Artstor’s alliance with JSTOR, I can also include further reading about teaching Art and Design. These groups can be found in Teaching Resources under Studio Art. My approach is but one of many; since an image group can be copied and then altered as needed, we thought it might serve as a valuable starting point for studio teachers.  

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