Skip to Main Content

Blog

December 4, 2015

Friday Links: the dark truth about stripes and polka dots

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Continue Reading »

Posted in
December 3, 2015

Now available: modern and contemporary art from the National Gallery of Art

Artstor and the National Gallery of Art have now released more than 11,000 images of modern and contemporary artworks from the museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library.

This release includes work from such important 20th- and 21st-century artists such as Vito Acconci, Carl Andre, Louise Bourgeois, John Cage, Vija Celmins, Chuck Close, Helen Frankenthaler, Philip Guston, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, William Kentridge, Franz Kline, Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Kerry James Marshall, Georgia O’Keeffe, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, Amy Sillman, Frank Stella, Wayne Thiebaud, and Richard Tuttle, as well as significant collections of the work of Richard Diebenkorn (1,200 pieces) and Mark Rothko (nearly 900 pieces).

Continue Reading »

Posted in
November 23, 2015

Audubon and Audubon

ARMNIG_10313260159

Attributed to John James Audubon, Pomarine Jager; Lestris Pomarinus, 1827-38. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

No doubt you are familiar with the work of the renowned wildlife artist John James Audubon, most likely his famous prints from The Birds of America. But did you know he wasn’t the only artist in the family? His son, John Woodhouse Audubon, spent much of his career supporting the work of his father, but he made a valuable contribution to wildlife documentation himself. (You can compare the two Audubons’ styles in the images below: the father’s are on the left, the son’s on the right.)

Continue Reading »

Posted in | Tagged
November 20, 2015

Friday links: Gluten free art, photos made from starch, and a preservation crisis

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel; builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some links we have been reading this week:

  • Scared of gluten in your art, fear no more the internet now has the Gluten-Free Museum.
  • Could this hellish landscape be a work by Hieronymus Bosch? Experts now think so.
  • Photographers have tried many methods to capture images, including using potato starch.
  • And speaking of, take a look at the preservation challenges film faces today.
  • An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but could visiting a museum or stunning landmark also boost your immune system?
  • And finally, we are suckers for recreations of classic works of art. For example, these Klimt works recreated for an annual AIDS charity event.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
November 13, 2015

Friday Links: Friday the 13th edition

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Happy Friday the 13th! Here’s a mixture of creepy and magical stories to keep you from getting into trouble today.

Learn more about this unlucky day from what we’ve discovered before.

 

Continue Reading »

Posted in
November 11, 2015

Botticelli, Michelangelo, and the importance of drawing

Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Kenyon Cox (1856-1919) might now be best remembered for his murals in the Library of Congress, as well as in the state capitol buildings of Des Moines, St. Paul, and Madison, but he was also a respected writer and influential teacher. In 1911, he delivered a series of lectures on painting at the Art Institute of Chicago, later published as The Classic Point of View. His accessible writing style and his infectious enthusiasm for the Old Masters still speak to us today. Following is an excerpt from his lecture on the importance of drawing, focusing on the work of Botticelli and Michelangelo.

Drawing is a great expressional art and deals with beauty and significance, not with mere fact. Its great masters are the greatest artists that ever lived, and high attainment in it has always been rarer than high attainment in color. Its tools are the line and so much of light and shade as is necessary to convey the sense of bulk and modelling, anything more being something added for its own beauty and expressiveness, not a part of the sources of the draftsman. Its aims are, first, to develop in the highest degree the abstract beauty and significance possessed by lines in themselves, more or less independently of representation; second, to express with the utmost clearness and force the material significance of objects and, especially, of the human body. According as one or the other of these aims predominates we have one or the other of the two great schools into which draftsmen may be divided. These schools may be typified by the greatest masters of each, the school of Botticelli, or the school of pure line; the school of Michelangelo, or the school of significant form. Between these lie all the law and the prophets. Of course no artist ever belonged entirely and exclusively to either school. It is always a matter of balance and the predominance of interest. Even a Botticelli tried to put some significant form inside his beautiful lines, and even Michelangelo gave thought to the abstract beauty of his lines apart from the significant form they bounded.

Continue Reading »

Posted in | Tagged
November 6, 2015

Friday Links: The Colossus of Rhodes is coming back–bigger!

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • “When I came to New York, a couple of ladies sent me needlepoint pillows.” The forgotten story of Frank Stella’s cushions.
  • There are a number of risks associated with art restoration: you may damage the work, you may inadvertently change the original, and, oddly, you might be surprised by what you might uncover.
  • Greece is planning on recreating the legendary Colossus of Rhodes, one of the original Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Times being what they are, this one is going to be four times the size of the long-lost original.
  • Artist Harry Smith picked up every paper airplane he saw on the streets of Manhattan from 1961 to 1983. They look amazing.

Continue Reading »

Posted in
October 30, 2015

Friday Links: artists’ graves and the elephant beneath the Vatican

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Continue Reading »

Posted in
October 23, 2015

Friday Links: happy little trees, celebrity art quiz, Monet’s ghost, and more

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Continue Reading »

Posted in
October 20, 2015

Now available: Abby Williams Hill from the University of Puget Sound

20469_UofPS_stacked_maroonRGB200Artstor and the University of Puget Sound have released more than 120 images of works by the painter, activist, and writer Abby Williams Hill in the Digital Library.

Abby Williams Hill (b.1861) is best known for her commissions for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railways. Her railway works were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905, the Jamestown Tricentennial in 1907, and the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. These pieces, along with her other landscapes, offer a rich portrait of the natural landscape of the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The accompanying archive of papers and personal materials offer insight into Hill’s life and provides an example of the American experience between the Civil War and World War II.

Continue Reading »

Posted in