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February 3, 2016

Reading the Codex Mendoza

The Codex Mendoza, early 1540s

The ‘Codex Mendoza’, pt. I.; fol. 002r, early 1540s. Image and original data provided by the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Copyright Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

As we built our AP® Art History Teaching Resources over the last three years, we found ourselves fascinated by some of the newly required content. Over the next year, we will offer periodic webinars on some of these works of art and architecture; the first one will be on the Colonial Americas.

The art of the Colonial Americas is represented in the curriculum framework by six distinct objects. One of these is the “Codex Mendoza,” named for the first viceroy of Mexico (1535-1550), who commissioned it c. 1542 (contributed to the Artstor Digital Library by the Bodleian Library). Intended as a gift to Charles V, the manuscript never reached the monarch.

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January 29, 2016

Friday Links: women in art, cat funerals, and classical Star Wars

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Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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January 28, 2016

Artstor and ITHAKA join forces

Alliance will enhance access to multimedia digital resources to support education and research

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James Shulman, President of Artstor, and Kevin Guthrie, President of ITHAKA, today announced a new strategic alliance between the two not-for-profit organizations that will benefit thousands of colleges, universities, schools, museums, and other educational institutions. Artstor, the provider of the Artstor Digital Library of images and the Shared Shelf platform for cataloguing and digital asset management, will now function under the umbrella of ITHAKA, which currently operates the services JSTOR, Portico and Ithaka S+R.

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January 22, 2016

Friday Links: artist fights, spooky painting, hidden art

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Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • The Getty is running what it calls a “Historical Serial” on Tumblr, and we’re overcome with jealousy because it’s so brilliant. Start here.
  • The popular perception of artists is often of brooding intellectuals, but it turns out that a fair number of them aren’t above the occasional fisticuffs.
  • Beneath a painting of John Dee performing an experiment for Elizabeth I lays a dark and slightly terrifying secret.
  • This story has been freaking out everyone who reads it: Museums are keeping a ton of the world’s most famous art locked away in storage. (Though you can still see most of it in Artstor, ahem.)
  • Fascinating peek at Louise Bourgeois’ house as she left it. Bonus: great photo of the artist wearing a latex cast of one of her works!
  • Could the mysterious paintings in one of the world’s most famous caves be the oldest-known depiction of a volcanic eruption?

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January 21, 2016

Join us for a Twitter chat on Visual Literacy

Shanghai: colors, textures of traffic, advertising and housing

Shanghai: colors, textures of traffic, advertising and housing. Image and original data provided by ART on FILE, www.artonfile.com

More than at any other time in history, images dominate our lives. Instructors need the resources to teach students how to find visual media, interpret its meaning, evaluate its sources, use it effectively, and explain the ethical, legal, social, and economic issues surrounding its creation and use.

Join Artstor’s User Services team and your fellow instructors on Twitter to share your experiences, successes, and challenges—and your questions—on teaching Visual Literacy.

Among the questions up for discussion will be:

  • What place does visual literacy have in your curriculum?
  • Which departments teach it?
  • What resources do you use?

Follow and participate with @ArtstorHelp on Tuesday, February 9, 1-2 PM EST (10-11 AM PST) using the hashtag #artstorchat

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January 20, 2016

Diego Rivera: the artist through his own eyes

Frida Kahlo is world-famous for her self-portraits, which were a big part of her relatively small oeuvre (55 out of 144 paintings), while her husband Diego Rivera, despite producing much more work than Kahlo, only painted himself approximately 20 times. Why is that?

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January 19, 2016

Now available: IAP images from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Winslow Homer, The Fog Warning, 1885. Image © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Winslow Homer, The Fog Warning, 1885. Image © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Artstor and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) are making available approximately 1,200 images from the Museum’s permanent collection in the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.  The IAP program provides high-quality image files to scholars for academic publications at no charge. For more information, visit artstor.org/iap.

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January 15, 2016

Friday Links: Fake titles, restored studios, and incorrupt bodies

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Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • From Cezanne to Rembrandt, paintings by famous artists all too often have names that don’t really match the work. How does this happen? (You might remember that we touched on that topic on our post about Botticelli’s Primavera.)
  • The Louvre is about to restore Leonardo da Vinci’s St. John the Baptist. How do you clean a masterpiece, anyway? Very carefully.
  • Piet is a programming language in which the programs are abstract pictures. To be honest we’re not sure what that means, but we like it anyway.
  • So you want to photograph the incorrupt, a group of saints whose bodies supposedly won’t decompose. A word of warning: it’s complicated.

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January 8, 2016

Now available: Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum

Jean Lurcat Celui qui aime ecrit sur les murs [One who loves writes on the walls], ca. 1924. © Smithsonian Institution, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Jean Lurcat Celui qui aime ecrit sur les murs [One who loves writes on the walls], ca. 1924. © Smithsonian Institution, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor and the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum have just released more than 8,200 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum is the only museum in the United States devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. The Museum presents compelling perspectives on the impact of design on daily life through active educational and curatorial programming.

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January 8, 2016

Friday Links: healing masks, a forger’s secrets, and a frosty bridge

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Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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