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February 5, 2018

Now available: 9,000 images from the Mattress Factory

The Mattress Factory has contributed almost 9,000 images* to the Artstor Digital Library documenting installations exhibited at the museum during the last four decades.

This innovative museum of contemporary art, established in Pittsburgh in 1977, has supported hundreds of artists in creating site-specific installations. Starting with James Turrell, the Mattress Factory has for 40 years housed hundreds of works by celebrated and lesser-known artists. This includes many with international reputations, such as Deborah Aschheim, Russell Crotty, Than Htay Maung, Chiharu Shiota, and Carrie Mae Weems, among others. It is a leader in site-specific, contemporary art that pushes the boundaries of artists and viewers.

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February 1, 2018

Artstor at the College Art Association Annual Conference

 

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Emmanuel Wyttenbach, Book cover to an Illustrated Tourist Guide of Noted Summer & Winter Resorts of California, published by: H. S. Crocker & Co., ca. 1870-80. Image and original data provided by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

College Art Association Annual Conference
February 21-24 2018
Los Angeles, CA

Meet Artstor’s Education & Outreach team in the exhibition hall at booth #336. We’d love to say hello and chat about your work and your experience using the new Artstor.

Are you a faculty member who uses images to teach? If you would be willing to share your experiences with us after the conference, please visit the booth to sign up to for a user research interview with our product team. You’ll get an Amazon gift card–and our eternal gratitude–as a thank you.

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January 29, 2018

Building a new Artstor: 2017 in review

Matthias Buchinger, Calligraphic Trompe-l’oeil Calendar, 1709, image and original data provided by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

2017 was a big year for Artstor. Not only did we add over 350,000 new images, but we also completely overhauled the Artstor platform, creating a new interface and tools while improving the back-end systems that power the site to increase search speed and reliability. Here’s what changed:

  • Artstor got a facelift with a new, streamlined interface design.
  • Images open on a new page rather than as pop-ups. Pop-ups are difficult to navigate when you aren’t able to adjust your browser settings, as is often the case on computers managed by an IT department. This change also allows you to link directly to an image and its data without opening a pop-up, which is confusing to recipients (especially those who have pop-ups blocked and find a link leads to nowhere).
  • Images are now on a IIIF viewer with fullscreen capabilities and side-by-side comparison mode. Read more about IIIF’s incredible work on their site.
  • We simplified image-group sharing: all registered users can share image groups with other users at your institution, not just faculty. Now, students can collaborate on image groups and faculty can more easily work with students and TA’s to curate groups.
  • Artstor now includes a flashcard mode in the fullscreen image view to study for exams. Read more about this feature on our support site.
  • We increased Artstor’s web accessibility for users with disabilities.
  • Our URLs are now shorter for easier linking in LibGuides, course websites, emails, and more.
  • The entire site is mobile friendly. Direct your smartphone’s browser to library.artstor.org, sign in, and enjoy Artstor’s full set of features. Remember to turn your phone sideways for full-screen views!
  • Image citations are now available in many formats, including APA, Chicago, and MLA style.

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January 19, 2018

Artstor 2017: a kaleidoscope of cultures across the ages

Over the past year, we have released a veritable virtual feast of fresh imagery in the Artstor Digital Library. Thanks to the generosity of many partners we have published 23 collections (additional or enhanced), with hundreds of thousands of images across disciplines. We are now approaching the 2.5 million mark!* 2017 proved an annus mirabilis with something for everyone, from 15th-century feather work to contemporary sculpture.

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December 21, 2017

Now available: additional images from the Museum of the City of New York

Edmund V. Gillon, photographer. Looking south on South Street to the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges and the Lower Manhattan skyline, c. 1977. Image and data provided by Museum of the City of New York.

Edmund V. Gillon, photographer. Looking south on South Street to the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges and the Lower Manhattan skyline, c. 1977. Image and data provided by Museum of the City of New York.

The Museum of the City of New York has contributed approximately 17,300 additional images from its permanent collection to the Artstor Digital Library, bringing their total to more than 71,000.*

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December 19, 2017

Now available: additional images from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Richard Serra. The Matter of Time. 2005. Installation of seven sculptures, weatherproof steel. © 2014 Richard Serra / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

Richard Serra. The Matter of Time. 2005. Installation of seven sculptures, weatherproof steel. © 2014 Richard Serra / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation is contributing approximately 850 additional images from the permanent collections of four of its museums to the Artstor Digital Library, bringing their total to nearly 8,000.*

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December 12, 2017

Now available: highlights from the collection of The Morgan Library & Museum

Paul Cezanne. Still Life with Pears and Apples, Covered Blue Jar, and a Bottle of Wine. 19th century. Watercolor on wove paper. Image and data provided by The Morgan Library and Museum.

Paul Cézanne. Still Life with Pears and Apples, Covered Blue Jar, and a Bottle of Wine. 19th century. Watercolor on wove paper. Image and data provided by The Morgan Library and Museum.

The Morgan Library & Museum (The Morgan) has contributed approximately 200 images from its permanent collection to the Artstor Digital Library. The selection provides a range of highlights from The Morgan’s European drawings collection from the Renaissance to the 20th century, featuring celebrated works from Albrecht Dürer through Francisco Goya and Paul Cézanne.

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December 12, 2017

Now available: the New-York Historical Society: Museum & Library

William Davis Hassler. Mr. Sowerby on his horse on the Speedway near High Bridge, New York City, undated (ca. 1905-1911). Washington Bridge visible.|William D. Hassler photograph collection, approximately 1910-1921. William Davis Hassler. Image and data from New-York Historical Society: Museum & Library.

William Davis Hassler. Mr. Sowerby on his horse on the Speedway near High Bridge, New York City, undated (ca. 1905-1911). Washington Bridge visible.|William D. Hassler photograph collection, approximately 1910-1921. William Davis Hassler. Image and data from New-York Historical Society: Museum & Library.

The New-York Historical Society (New-York Historical) is contributing more than 21,000 images from its museum and library collections to the Artstor Digital Library. The selection encompasses many aspects of the combined resources of the New-York Historical, including highlights across the diverse collecting areas—American paintings, sculpture, prints and drawings, decorative arts and artifacts, and historical photographs.

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November 30, 2017

Around the web: Alec Baldwin’s fake painting, art by political prisoners, and why do people touch art?

  • Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web

    Victor Hugo, Vianden Seen through a Spider Web, 1871. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

    Unauthorized touching makes some museums a multi-sensory experience–but why do museum-goers do it?

  • A team of archeologists from the University of Cincinnati recently discovered an intricately carved sealstone that “will change the way that prehistoric art is viewed.”
  • The National Gallery in London will be exhibiting a survey of black & white paintings exploring why artists from the 14th through 20th centuries have chosen to create monochrome works.
  • Research shows that while people can recognize corporate logos, they are terrible at recreating them as drawings.

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