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April 1, 2016

Friday Links: maltreated books, rubber ducks, and no April Fools’ jokes

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Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • The San Jose Public Library wants its books back. And its CDs and DVDs. Taken altogether, library patrons are holding onto or have damaged 97,000 items and owe the city $6.8 million in fines and fees. The situation is so out of control that about 40 percent of the city’s library cardholders can no longer borrow anything until they return their library holdings and pay what they owe.”
  • And speaking of the maltreatment of books, holes in the pages of manuscripts are the result of many causes. But, unlike damaged library books, these holes sometimes add to the books’ beauty: check out the images.
  • One would think an artist famous for sending giant rubber ducks around the world would have a great sense of humor, but he was not laughing when he accused Brazilian protesters of plagiarism after they used a similarly enormous rubber bird as a statement against their president.

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April 1, 2016

Piotr Adamczyk to Lead Image and Museum Relationships for ITHAKA

IthakaITHAKA, the not-for-profit leader in advancing and preserving knowledge worldwide, announced that Piotr Adamczyk will join the organization as Director of Image Content and Museum Partnerships.

Adamczyk will lead ITHAKA’s efforts to partner with cultural organizations around the world to grow the Artstor Digital Library, an online resource for teaching and research that includes more than 2 million high-quality images from museums, artists’ estates, and archives. He will also head up a new team of designers and developers that will collaborate with these image contributors and users to identify and pursue new ideas for engaging and improving their work.

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March 29, 2016

Teaching Global Contemporary Art in AP® Art History

Wangechi Mutu, A Little Thought for All Ya'll Who're Thinking of Beating Around the Bush

Wangechi Mutu, A Little Thought for All Ya’ll Who’re Thinking of Beating Around the Bush, 2004. Contact: Alexandra Giniger, Studio Manager, Wangechi Mutu Studio ali@wangechimutu.com

Next week we will offer Teaching Global Contemporary Art in AP® Art History, the second in our series of occasional webinars on works of art and architecture in the AP® Art History curriculum. To help us navigate this topic, we have enlisted art historian Dr. Virginia Spivey as our guest presenter. Dr. Spivey specializes in the art of the late-20th and 21st centuries and the scholarship of teaching and learning in art history (you can read about her many achievements below).

Global Contemporary Art is represented in the curriculum framework by 27 works of art; after polling a group of AP® Art History teachers, Dr. Spivey has settled on the work of five artists: Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Mariko Mori, Wangechi Mutu, Xu Bing, and Bill Viola.

Please join us Monday, April 4th at 7PM EST for a lively discussion on these contemporary artists and the art and ideas that influence them. Register here.

— Dana Howard, Senior K-12 Relationship Manager

– – –

For more than 19 years, Dr. Virginia Spivey has taught in museum and academic settings, where she has received two university teaching awards and multiple nominations. Since 2009, she has worked independently, providing expert content and developing curricular resources for clients including Pearson-Prentice Hall and Smarthistory at the Khan Academy while teaching part time at Georgetown, the George Washington University, and the Maryland Institute College of Art. Dr. Spivey recently revised the chapter on “Art since 1950” as a contributing author to Stokstad’s Art History (forthcoming 2016) and is currently working with the National Gallery of Art to redesign their docent training curriculum in art history. Since 2014, she has been a contributing editor at AHTR, a peer-populated open educational resource and online community for art history instructors, where she served as project leader to create Art History Pedagogy and Practice, an academic e-journal slated to launch in fall 2016.

AP® and Advanced Placement® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this website.

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March 25, 2016

Friday Links: prison art, truck art, temporary-tattoo art

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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March 23, 2016

Case study: Preserving and sharing a school’s rich history

Editor’s note: this post was updated to include current information about Artstor’s platform for public collections.
Nursing Program Students, 1949. Courtesy of Santa Rosa Junior College Archives.

Nursing Program Students, 1949. Courtesy of Santa Rosa Junior College Archives.

At the end of 1917, the Federated Home & School Association of Santa Rosa sent a recommendation to the local Board of Education to form a junior college. The following fall, Santa Rosa Junior College offered its first classes at the Santa Rosa High School. Its student body numbered only 19, with eight educators. It would take another 13 years before the College could boast a faculty of its own.

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March 21, 2016

Three classical myths to keep you awake

If you’re still trying to adjust to the start of Daylight Saving Time, we’d like to give you a little bit of advice: don’t let the mythological gods of Greece and Rome catch you napping. Seeing mortals sleeping seems to bring out the worst in them.

Here are three of the most notorious examples:

Endymion and Selene

Depending on whom you ask, Zeus either offered the beautiful shepherd Endymion a wish and Endymion chose to sleep and remain youthful forever, or the eternal sleep wasn’t a gift at all, but rather a punishment because Endymion had attempted to seduce Zeus’ wife, Hera.

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March 18, 2016

Friday Links: Daredevil, Donald Trump, and Da Vinci

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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March 15, 2016

Did you know you can download and print image details?

square_logo (2)You may already know that you can zoom in to see detailed views of the images in the Artstor Digital Library, but did you know that you can also save, download, and print the details themselves? You can include these image details in image groups and presentations. It’s easy!

To create an image detail:

  • Log in to your registered Artstor account
  • Double-click on an image thumbnail to open it in the image viewer
  • In zoom modeclick on the image to create your desired thumbnail.

Now you can:

  1. Print the image detail by clicking 
  2. Download the image detail as a JPG file by clicking 
  3. Save the image detail to an image group by clicking . Once you’ve added it to an image group, it can be exported to PowerPoint, OIV, or in an image group zip download.

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March 14, 2016

Artstor at NAEA 2016

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NAEA Convention 2016
March 17-19
Chicago, IL

We invite you to visit Artstor at booth 611 to discover how the Digital Library’s more than two million images can bring art history to life and inspire your students in studio classes.

EVENT

Curating Content in AP® Art History: Leading Successful Students
Saturday, March 19 at 8 AM
E263/Level 2

Dana Howard, our Senior K-12 Relationship Manager, will lead participants in exploring curating content and developing solid guiding questions that help students master essential art historical skills and excel in AP® Art History.

AP® and Advanced Placement® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this website.

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March 14, 2016

Now available: additional images from Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art

Composite Pendant, 18th century / 19th century, Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art. Photo: Richard Walker

Composite Pendant, 18th century / 19th century, Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art. Photo: Richard Walker

Artstor has released approximately 300 new images of Islamic and South Asian art from the Shangri La, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art in the Digital Library.

This brings the collection total to nearly 800 images of Indian jewelry and enamels; Syrian, Indian, Spanish, and Persian furniture, doors, and ceilings; Persian and Turkish tile panels and portable ceramics; and Central Asian, Persian, Turkish, and Indian textiles.

Duke developed a lifelong interest in Islamic art during her travels, particularly in decorative arts of the 17th through 19th centuries, especially those of the Ottoman, Mughal, Safavid, and Qajar dynasties, and she also commissioned art from contemporary Muslim artists. Over the course of nearly 60 years, Duke amassed

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