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May 19, 2016

Now available: East Asian rock-cut caves and South Asian art from David Efurd

DavidEfurd

Kondane Caves, Caves 1 & 2; 100 BCE; India, Maharashtra. Image and original data provided by David Efurd © David Efurd

Artstor and David Efurd are now sharing approximately 10,000 images of rock-cut Buddhist caves, sites, sculptures, and monasteries in India and Korea; Hindu and Jain sites; and ancient and medieval sculptures from museums in India.

Between the 3rd century BCE and the 10th century CE, Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain temples and monasteries were carved into stone cliffs in India. Efurd documented well-known, highly embellished cave sites such as Ajanta, Ellora, Bhaja, Karli, Elephanta, Jogeshvari, and Udaigiri, as well as lesser-known sites like Karadh, Kondana, and Dhamnar. Efurd also photographed many other archaeological sites and works in various museums, such as the Indian Museum in Calcutta.

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May 16, 2016

Case study: Documenting bastides, France’s medieval market towns

Editor’s note: this post was updated to reflect Artstor’s platform changes.
John Reps, Monpazier

John Reps, Monpazier, 1951 (founded 1284)

In the 13th century, southwestern France gave birth to several hundred new planned towns, partly to replace villages destroyed in the Albigensian Crusades and partly to revivify a stagnating economy and tame areas of wilderness¹. Some were designed as fortress communities, while others were laid out as simple agricultural villages. The great majority, however, had a different function. Known as bastides, they were created as market towns with the aim of concentrating the population in secure places for ease of administration while returning a profit to their sponsors. Their founders were the great feudal lords of the region: kings, dukes, counts, and viscounts.

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May 15, 2016

Now available: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is pleased to collaborate with Artstor to make available approximately 1,000 images of works from the Foundation’s collections in its Digital Library. Spanning the breadth and depth of the collections, works from all aspects of the collections including paintings, drawings, maps, prints, textiles, ceramics, glass, metals, furniture, numismatics, and mechanical arts and arms will be shown, effective May 15, 2016.

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May 13, 2016

Friday Links: the pros and cons of Instagram, selfies, and guns

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • We continue to be on the lookout for anything that legitimizes our more self-indulgent interests, so we’ve fallen in love with @ArtGarments, an Instagram account that zooms in on the most fabulous fashion in art history.
  • On a less cheerful direction, here’s a comparison of the Rich Kids of Instagram to the paintings of European elites.
  • And on a tangentially related note, while attempting to take a selfie, someone knocked over a revered 126-year-old Portuguese statue, smashing it to bits.
  • Moving away from Instagram and selfies, these Russian portraits “can bring us closer to its subject than any new-fangled photograph could do.” And without breaking anything, either.
  • On a recent episode of Antiques Roadshow, an expert pronounced a clay jug to be worth “up to $50,000.” Sadly, it turned out to be someone’s high school ceramics project.

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May 10, 2016

Now available: Amistad Research Center

Elizabeth Catlett; Dancing, 1990. Image and original data provided by Amistad Research Center, Tulane University. Art © Estate of Elizabeth Catlett / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. This work of art is protected by copyright and/or related rights and may not be reproduced in any manner, except as permitted under the Artstor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use, without the prior express written authorization of VAGA, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2820, New York, NY 10118. Tel.: 212-736-6666, fax: 212-736-6767, email: info@vagarights.com.

Elizabeth Catlett; Dancing, 1990. Image and original data provided by Amistad Research Center, Tulane University. Art © Estate of Elizabeth Catlett / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. This work of art is protected by copyright and/or related rights and may not be reproduced in any manner, except as permitted under the Artstor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use, without the prior express written authorization of VAGA, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2820, New York, NY 10118. Tel.: 212-736-6666, fax: 212-736-6767, email: info@vagarights.com.

Artstor and the Amistad Research Center are now making available in the Digital Library nearly 300 images from the Center’s art collection, focusing on works by Harlem Renaissance masters from the Harmon Foundation.

The collection in Artstor includes Jacob Lawrence’s The Life of Toussaint L’Ouverture, the artist’s first historical series, as well as the work of many other important African American artists such as Romare Bearden, Hale Woodruff, Aaron Douglas, and Elizabeth Catlett.

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May 6, 2016

Friday Links: Star Wars, Freud, and the gold toilet

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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May 3, 2016

A well-deserved salute to AP® Art History teachers

Each May, around the world, almost twenty five thousand students sit for the AP® Art History exam. This year’s test falls on the third of May (a date not lost on many seasoned Art History teachers). It is also quite different from the AP® exam you or your children may have taken. This time, students will be taking a test that covers a newly designed AP® Art History curriculum. This is the first year that the exam is truly global in nature.

This curriculum includes works from the European tradition that we all learned in our survey course, such as the Acropolis, but also goes beyond that to include artists from Native American tribal traditions, the rest of the Americas, and works from the Pacific, Africa, and Asia. There are now 250 key works of art or architecture that a student must know quite well in addition to those the teachers and students explore to round out the experience. For the first time, the AP® Art History exam covers something of the cultural heritage of each student in the room while providing them the chance to learn about our global artistic production.

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May 3, 2016

Case study: JSTOR Forum in the K-12 environment

Editor’s note: this post has been updated to reflect the name change from Shared Shelf to JSTOR Forum.

We invited Lisa Laughy, Web Services/Archives Assistant at St. Paul’s School’s Ohrstrom Library in Concord, New Hampshire to tell us about her experience as the first K-12 subscriber to JSTOR Forum (formerly called Shared Shelf), Artstor’s digital media management system.

When I first started looking at software for cataloging our archives photo collection back in 2010, I remember wishing I could find a solution that was just like Artstor – something that combines both a visually rich user experience with the sophistication of professional metadata standards. It took a few years, but it was as if the folks at Artstor read my mind and made my wish come true, when in the fall of 2015 our school was given the opportunity to be one of the first high schools to implement Shared Shelf.

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April 29, 2016

Friday Links: Heroic librarians, artistic roaches, and psychopathic artists

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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April 28, 2016

Artistry on the high seas: Captain Cook’s artists

Sydney Parkinson, Family: Carcharhinidae Genus/Species: Prionace glauca, 1769

Sydney Parkinson, Family: Carcharhinidae Genus/Species: Prionace glauca, 1769. Image and original data provided by Natural History Museum, London.

On his famous three voyages to the South Seas, British explorer Captain James Cook charted the largely unexplored Pacific Ocean, achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and completed the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. But Cook’s nautical feats are only part of the story; of equal importance are the contributions made by the artists who went along on his journeys, risking their lives–and sometimes losing them–to illustrate the animals and plants they encountered for science and posterity. Here are their stories.

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